Posts Tagged ‘style’

PechaKucha 20 for 20 Presentation Style Makes Its Foray Into Photography

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PechaKucha is a presentation style that gives presenters exactly 20 slides and 20 seconds per slide to get their point across. Designed by architects Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham in Tokyo in 2003, what started as a weekly show-and-tell format at their firm has become a world-wide presentation phenomenon that recently broke into the world of photography. Read more…

Film Noir-style Engagement Photos from a 1920s-Themed Shoot

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Belgian photographer Filip Bunkens recently did an engagement photo shoot with a couple named Mattias and Adinda, who proposed that it be 1920s-themed. Last Sunday morning they gathered at a local jazz bar for the session.
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Joel Meyerowitz Says He Despises Bruce Gilden’s Attitude, Calls Him a Bully

Sean O’Hagan over at The Observer has published an interesting profile of famed NYC street photographer Joel Meyerowitz, who had some pretty harsh things to say about his fellow NYC street shooter, Bruce Gilden:

I ask Meyerowitz about the combative, confrontational style of street photography espoused by the likes of fellow New Yorker Bruce Gilden, and he grows visibly angry for the only time in our conversation. “He’s a f**king bully. I despise the work, I despise the attitude, he’s an aggressive bully and all the pictures look alike because he only has one idea – ‘I’m gonna embarrass you, I’m going to humiliate you.’ I’m sorry, but no.”

Meyerowitz says that his street photography style is based on his boxer father’s advice to “pay attention” and anticipate the actions of the people he photographed. So here’s the difference between these two famous street photographers: one anticipates, and the other instigates.

Joel Meyerowitz: ‘brilliant mistakes … amazing accidents’ [The Observer]


P.S. Last month we wrote on how Gilden’s street photography attitude carries over into his teaching persona as well.


Thanks for sending in the tip, Phil!


Image credit: Joel Meyerowitz portrait 11/03/2012 reception by Jill Gewirtz

Woodenize Your Camera Using Wallpaper or Wood Veneer

Photographer Patrick Ng has an obsession with natural materials such as wood and leather. Recently, he decided to “woodenize” his beloved Canon F-1n SLR (a professional film SLR released back in 1976). He didn’t use a pre-made kit for the conversion, though… Instead, he simply ripped off the faux-leather and replaced it with faux-wood wallpaper.
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First Glimpse at a Retro-styled Compact from Fuji, Possibly Named the “XP1″

Fuji already introduced retro, Leica-style design to the world of mirrorless cameras with its gorgeous X series line, and now it appears that the company wants to do the same thing for the world of point-and-shoots. New leaked photos, first published on Digicam-info, show an unknown compact camera by Fujifilm that features a slick leather wrap and an elegantly minimal UI — a camera that definitely wouldn’t embarrass fashion-forward folk.
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Upgrade the Look of Black Picture Frames with Spray Paint and Painters Tape

After seeing some elegant black picture frames with brass edges in a designer magazine, Courtney of A Thoughtful Place realized that she could create the same look on the cheap by using some plain painter’s tape and a can of brass spray paint. The project takes a couple hours to complete and a few dollars in supplies, and is a thrifty way to add a dash of style to your home if you don’t want to shell out money for pricey frames.

DIY Brass Frames: HB Knock Off (via Lifehacker)


Image credits: Photographs by Courtney/A Thoughtful Place

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Moonlight Photographs by a Nocturnal Photographer

Argentinian photographer Alejandro Chaskielberg started as a photojournalist before turning to documentary photography and developing his trademark style of shooting under moonlight and using strobes and long exposures to illuminate his subjects. His portrait subjects are asked to remain motionless for long periods of time as he photographs them using a large format film camera. He recently applied his style to a series on residents of Northern Kenya — a location that’s typically photographed under the harsh midday sun.
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Photographs That Resemble Traditional Chinese Paintings

Don Hong-Oai was a San Francisco-based Chinese photographer who created beautiful images that resembled traditional Chinese paintings.

The photographs of Don Hong-Oai are made in a unique style of photography, which can be considered Asian pictorialism. This method of adapting a Western art for Eastern purposes probably originated in the 1940s in Hong Kong. One of its best known practitioners was the great master Long Chin-San (who died in the 1990s at the age of 104) with whom Don Hong-Oai studied. With the delicate beauty and traditional motifs of Chinese painting (birds, boats, mountains, etc.) in mind, photographers of this school used more than one negative to create a beautiful picture, often using visual allegories. Realism was not a goal.

Hong-Oai was one of the last photographers to use this technique, and was also arguably the best.
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Walnut and Cherry Wood Coverings for the Fujifilm X100

Remember the light brown leather X100 special edition announced by Fujifilm a couple of days ago? While those might come with a unique limited edition serial number, the look apparently isn’t as unique. As a commenter pointed out, it appears to be a covering offered by a shop named Aki-Asahi Custom Camera Coverings. There are quite a few styles in addition to that look (which is named “Lizard Ochre”), including a couple of beautiful wood coverings crafted from walnut and cherry wood.
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Roaming the Sidewalks of Derby with Street Photographer Bruce Gilden

Magnum street photographer Bruce Gilden shoots his candid portraits on sidewalks by walking right up to strangers and sticking his camera and flash up into their faces, as seen in the “walking NYC streets” video we featured last year. In the behind-the-scenes video above, British Journal of Photography editor Olivier Laurent follows Gilden around as he shoots a project in Derby, England.

(via Photoxels)