Posts Tagged ‘study’

Photo Sharing is Hurting Our Enjoyment of Life, Study Finds

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Smartphones and social networks have made snapping and sharing photos extremely easy to do, allowing us to preserve our memories and broadcast our experiences. It’s not all positive, though: there are downsides to our snap- and selfie-happy culture.

A new study has found that 58% of people believe that “posting the perfect picture has prevented them from enjoying life’s experiences.”
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The Importance of Cameras in the Smartphone War

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When new smartphones are announced these days, the camera quality and specs are usually front and center. If you’re wondering why manufacturers focus so much on mobile photography, check out the chart above: taking photos is the most used feature of smartphones alongside text messaging.
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Video: The Value of Professional Photojournalism

Here’s a 9-minute mini-documentary by the NPPA titled “The Value of Professional Photojournalism.” It examines the current state of the photojournalism and the changing landscape of news imagery.

The video also offers a glimpse into the eye-tracking study that the NPPA commissioned and reported on recently. That research found that pro shots are more memorable than amateur ones, and that people could tell the difference in 90% of the cases.

Study Finds that Professionally Captured Photos Are More Memorable Than Amateur Ones

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The National Press Photographers Association (NPPA) recently conducted a study that compares public perception of professional photographs versus amateur ones. The main conclusion was that, yes, people can tell the difference between the two, and that professional photographs are generally more memorable than their counterparts.
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Study Finds that Men Who Share Selfies Online Show More Psychopathic Tendencies

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Men who share selfies online are more likely to exhibit psychopathic tendencies. That’s what researchers are saying after conducting a lengthy study on the link between selfie-taking and certain personality traits.
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A Film Vs. Digital Study

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In an effort to prove to myself, my family, and my friends that I am not nuts to lug 6+ pounds of medium format camera gear up the mountainside I conducted my own tests over the last few weeks.

Sure one could set up a Resolution Target but that would not be a “real world” test, no sweat and sore muscles. Read more…

Study Finds 11 Percent of #nofilter Tagged Instagram Photos are Hefe-n Lying

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How dare they!? According to a study conducted by Spredfast, 11% of Instagram users posting under the #nofilter tag are in-fact using a filter. At an estimated 8.6 million photos, the collection of fibbing photographers is growing daily. Read more…

Study Shows that Even Subtle Changes In Portraits Drastically Alter Our Perception

05-misleading-first-impressions-1.w1120.h1382-542x670A fascinating new study on the perception of profile photos reveals some very interesting (and perhaps a bit nerve-wracking) results: even the slightest of changes from one portrait to another can dramatically alter how people perceive you in that photo. Read more…

Canon Report Finds 18% of People Bought Counterfeit Gear Unwittingly in 2013

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It’s no surprise that a market as vast and broad as photography is going to have problems with counterfeit gear, but the problem might be more prevalent than you think. According to a recent study commission by Canon, it’s estimated that some 18% of consumers have purchased counterfeit goods without knowing it, despite the fact that companies like Canon often try to educate customers about this sort of thing. Read more…

Taking Photographs Weakens Memories, Psychological Study Finds

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Here’s something that both photographers and the typical millennial have to look forward to in old age: Your memory is going to suck because of all the photos you took when you should have been paying attention to what was happening around you.

That’s the upshot of a new psychological study that finds you can have a good photographic record of an event or a good memory, but not both. Read more…