Posts Tagged ‘streetphotography’

Renowned Soul Musician Seal On Portrait Photography and Emotional Connection

Musicians, and all creative types really, often cross over into other creative endeavors that may or may not have anything to do with the field they’re famous for. It was only a few weeks ago that we featured a video of musician Moby talking about how much he loved photographing LA architecture. And today Leica has put together another of their “Leica Portraits,” this one on soul musician — and, of course, photography enthusiast — Seal.

The video does have the necessary Leica plug (around 2:30) but besides that everything that Seal talks about — from trading photo time for play time with his daughter, to the emotional connection he feels is necessary for great street and portrait photography — is interesting and relevant to anybody who loves the art of picture taking.

Leica Portrait: Seal (via The Leica Camera Blog)

Overcoming Your Fear of Street Photography in 31 Days

If you’ve ever gone out to try your hand at street photography you probably experienced your fair share of anxiety once you were out there. Taking photos of strangers, even on crowded city streets, takes practice and time, time that’s mostly spent getting over the natural fear of taking people’s photos without their permission. But the fact that it requires practice and time doesn’t mean that a few good tips won’t speed the process along significantly. Read more…

How to Photograph Complete Strangers

Portland-based photographer Jimmy Hickey made this helpful video in which he shares how he goes about shooting portraits of complete strangers he meets during his travels both overseas and on his local streets. He has some great tips that you can easily apply to your own street/documentary photography.

The Five ‘F’s of Street Photography

Here’s an interesting video in which street photographer John Free shares a system he’s developed to take the confusion and guesswork out of practicing street photography, called “the five Fs”. He says that contrary to popular belief, it’s not about “seeing”:

It’s not the eyes. Anybody can see that has eyes to see. It’s what we feel and what we get out of the heart that matters. We have to convey a passion. We have to convey an understanding.

The five Fs are: finding, figuring, framing, focusing, and firing.

(via DPS)

How Playing Video Games Can Help You Become a Better Street Photographer

People ask me, “Jun Shen, how do you shoot so fast on the streets?!?” I’m like a ninja, whipping out my camera, shooting it, and putting it away so quickly that my subjects don’t know what hit them. They walk away whispering to themselves, “What was that? Did he take our photo?

It’s thanks to video games, folks. Read on to find out why.
Read more…

Humans of New York: A Photographic Census of New York City

The United States is a diverse country, but there are few places in the US as diverse as New York City: “the greatest city on earth.” In many ways The City’s diversity makes it a street photographer’s gold-mine, and it’s this mine that photographer Brandon Stanton has been meticulously digging through over the last couple of years. Read more…

Stealthy Street Photography by the Czech Secret Police

In the 1970s and 80s the Czechoslovak secret police, among other things, were charged with surveying the population without their consent or, for that matter, knowledge. Taking pictures from under coats or inside suitcases, the secret police kept tabs on the goings on of the general public. And while the act itself is voyeuristic and creepy, the pictures turned out surprisingly well. Read more…

Stolen Moments: Matt Stuart on His Fascination with Street Photography

Here’s an interesting video in which street photographer Matt Stuart shares some of his work and talks about his love for street photography. In an interview with More Intelligent Life, Stuart states,

I’d like to be a mirror. And show people who live where I live what they’re like or what we’re doing or how we act. How we live. I think Garry Winogrand said he looks at people as animals and aren’t we bizarre? It is that standing back and trying to show us how we behave, and isn’t it funny or isn’t it sad or isn’t it ironic? I love how people act in public places.

One interesting statement he makes in the video: “the lovely thing about street photography is [...] that the best stuff there’s absolutely no way you can stage, or even think of. It just like… happened, and isn’t that weird? Then it’s gone.”

(via ISO 1200)

An Interview with Henri Cartier-Bresson, the Father of Photojournalism

A wonderful hour-long interview with Henri Cartier-Bresson.

(via Erik Kim)

Henri Cartier-Bresson on “The Decisive Moment”

Here’s what Henri Cartier-Bresson, the father of modern photojournalism, said about his concept of “The Decisive Moment” in an interview with The Washington Post in 1957:

Photography is not like painting. There is a creative fraction of a second when you are taking a picture. Your eye must see a composition or an expression that life itself offers you, and you must know with intuition when to click the camera.

That is the moment the photographer is creative. Oop! The Moment! Once you miss it, it is gone forever. [#]

The phrase was taken from a quote by the 17th century Cardinal de Retz, who stated, “There is nothing in this world that does not have a decisive moment.”


Image credit: A bit later after “the decisive moment” by AlexRK