Posts Tagged ‘streetphotography’

New Vermont Bill Would Make it Illegal to Photograph Anybody Without Consent

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A short form bill was recently introduced into the Vermont House of Representatives that ought to have photographers curious, if not worried. That’s because this particular bill seeks to “make it illegal to [photograph] a person without his or her consent … and distribute it,” essentially outlawing most forms of public photography. Read more…

Could Google Glass Work as a Tool For Street Photography?

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Google Glass has received a lot of criticism, particularly when it comes to privacy. Given the fact you can record video and take photos without people noticing, some could call it an opportunity for taking photos without permission. Now, in my spare time, I take photos with a particular interest in is Street Photography. Candid street photography is taking photos of any stranger without permission. Why is there this controversy over Glass when candid photography without permission is a growing genre of photography? That is my question.
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Documentary Explores the Explosion of ‘Street Style’ Fashion Photography

The rise of a plethora of fashion blogs has led, almost inevitably, to the rise of a style of fashion photography known as “street style.” The all-access blogging medium gave photography enthusiasts who admired what legends like Bill Cunningham do a way to break into the industry and share both their opinions and pictures.

Over the past several years, however, the practice has exploded — much to the chagrin of big fashion editors and journalists who now have to deal with massive crowds of photogs outside of major fashion shows. GARAGE Magazine’s Take My Picture is a short documentary that explores this explosion, and tries to offer both sides of the story. Read more…

Starry Street Photos of Chicago Captured Using an Off-Camera Flash

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Japanese photographer Satoki Nagata moved to Chicago in 1992 to document the city and its people. His background is in neuroscience (he has a PhD in the field), but his passion is creating intimate documentary photography projects in his city.

During a recent winter, Nagata decided to try his hand at using a flash for street photography at night. Instead of mounting his flash to his camera, however, he decided to use it off camera. Combined with the light rain and falling snow, the flash turned many of his photographs into abstract and surreal images that almost look as though he overlaid photographs of stars.
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Simultaneous Street Photography From Two Different Points of View

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Dutch photographers Thijs groot Wassink and Ruben Lundgren live in London and Beijing, and work together on photo projects as a duo known as WassinkLundgren. One of their collaborations is a set of street photographs shot on the sidewalks of Tokyo, Japan in 2009 and 2010. Titled Tokyo Tokyo, each of the pieces is a diptych showing the same “decisive moment” shot by both photographers at the same moment in time, and then arranged side by side.
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Studio Street Portraits From Two Hundred Feet Away

Photographers are usually trying to get closer to their subjects, be that in the wild or on the street. The photographers of MUMUȘ Photo Hub in Bucharest, Romania, however, decided to take a step back … actually quite a few steps back. Read more…

Travis Jensen Talks About His Passion for Street Photography in San Francisco

San Francisco-based street photographer Travis Jensen has made a name for himself capturing candid shots, many of them in the rough Tenderloin neighborhood in downtown San Francisco. In this video from KAYO TV, he explains his love of street photography and the city that has become his adopted home. Read more…

The Ethics of Photographing Random Strangers on the Street

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Street photography is a genre that every photographer will try at least once in his or her career. Its broad appeal stems from the fact that you can do it anywhere; there’s a human element to the images that captivate the viewer, and if done well, can make for some extremely arresting images.

However, it also requires balls. You have to get close enough to your subjects; and with people, invading personal space is uncomfortable (and possibly hazardous to health) for both photographer and subject.
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A Study of Light, Shadows, and Framing: Street Photos by Ray Metzker

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American photographer Ray K. Metzker has had a long and distinguished career in photography, and is well known for his cityscape and landscape images. Many of his street photographs exhibit what Henri Cartier-Bresson refers to as the “Decisive Moment” — that moment in which all the subjects and details in a scene come together just perfectly in your viewfinder.
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Joel Meyerowitz Says He Despises Bruce Gilden’s Attitude, Calls Him a Bully

Sean O’Hagan over at The Observer has published an interesting profile of famed NYC street photographer Joel Meyerowitz, who had some pretty harsh things to say about his fellow NYC street shooter, Bruce Gilden:

I ask Meyerowitz about the combative, confrontational style of street photography espoused by the likes of fellow New Yorker Bruce Gilden, and he grows visibly angry for the only time in our conversation. “He’s a f**king bully. I despise the work, I despise the attitude, he’s an aggressive bully and all the pictures look alike because he only has one idea – ‘I’m gonna embarrass you, I’m going to humiliate you.’ I’m sorry, but no.”

Meyerowitz says that his street photography style is based on his boxer father’s advice to “pay attention” and anticipate the actions of the people he photographed. So here’s the difference between these two famous street photographers: one anticipates, and the other instigates.

Joel Meyerowitz: ‘brilliant mistakes … amazing accidents’ [The Observer]


P.S. Last month we wrote on how Gilden’s street photography attitude carries over into his teaching persona as well.


Thanks for sending in the tip, Phil!


Image credit: Joel Meyerowitz portrait 11/03/2012 reception by Jill Gewirtz