Posts Tagged ‘strange’

Fashion Photographs with Faces Pressed Against Glass

Fashion photographs are generally shot to make the clothing and the models look attractive, but British photographer Neil Bedford chose not to go that route when shooting a series for clothing label Neighborhood‘s lookbook. He had his models press their faces against invisible panes of glass, resulting in quirky and humorous fashion photos featuring smeared faces.
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Thrifty Couples Opting for Photoshopped Wedding Photos in China

A strange bit of news coming out of China: couples are opting to have their wedding photos faked using Photoshop due to rising photography costs.

Rising cost of a wedding photo-shoot is forcing some Chinese couples to get their wedding albums prepared with the help of morphing offered by various online photography-related agencies. With the help of computer software like Photoshop, a couple’s ordinary photo can be added with wedding dresses, flowers or even a tropical island setting to create faux wedding images.

While the cost of a professional shoot in China can run upwards of $950, having your wedding photo album faked by online Photoshopping businesses only costs $50.

Chinese couples opting for faked wedding albums [Yahoo News]


Image credit: chinese wedding by chokola and Hawaii by Sarah_Ackerman

Crumpled Faces of Random Strangers

For his project titled “Good Morning!“, photographer Levi Mandel shot stealthy photos of unsuspecting strangers, printed out the faces, crumpled them up, and then re-photographed them.
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Touchy: A Bizarre Concept Camera that Shoots Based on Physical Touch

Touchy, by Hong Kong-based artist Eric Siu, is one of the strangest concept cameras we’ve seen. Here’s the description:

Touchy is a human camera, who is blinded constantly until someone’s touch enables the opening of the automated shutters. While a continuous physical contact is maintained between Touchy and a user, the camera shoots a photo every 10 seconds.

Oh, and the user is blinded by the camera’s closed shutters until there’s “human interaction”.

Touchy (via Washington Post)

Creative Self-Portraits Captured Inside an Airplane Lavatory

Lavatory Self-Portraits in the Flemish Style is a spontaneous portrait project that photographer Nina Katchadourian started while traveling by plane in 2010. Here’s her account:

While in the lavatory on a domestic flight in March 2010, I spontaneously put a tissue paper toilet cover seat cover over my head and took a picture in the mirror. The image evoked 15th-century Flemish portraiture. I decided to add more images made in this mode and planned to take advantage of a long-haul flight from San Francisco to Auckland, guessing that there were likely to be long periods of time when no one was using the lavatory on the 14-hour flight. I made several forays to the bathroom from my aisle seat, and by the time we landed I had a large group of new photographs entitled Lavatory Self-Portraits in the Flemish Style. I was wearing a thin black scarf that I sometimes hung up on the wall behind me to create the deep black ground that is typical of these portraits. There is no special illumination in use other than the lavatory’s own lights and all the images are shot hand-held with the camera phone.

Some people just have to flex their photographic muscles regardless of where they are…
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Quirky Camera Head Photographs

Japanese photographer kiyoshimachine has a quirky set of photographs titled Monster67 that features people wearing the “67 Head”, a giant Pentax SLR.
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Skydiving Fashion Shoot at 126MPH

To promote its new One X phone (and the camera on it), HTC came up with the bizarre idea of doing a skydiving fashion shoot with photography student Nick Jojola and model (and professional skydiver) Roberta Mancino. During the photoshoot above the Arizona desert, Jojola plummeted to Earth at 126MPH while Mancino whizzed by at 181MPH, giving the photographer a tiny window of 0.8 seconds to squeeze off the shot.
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DIY Large Format Camera Created From Photography Books

Artists Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs create homemade cameras out of bizarre objects such as turtle shells and large stones. The large format camera above was crafted out of a stack of photography books. Their experiments are documented in a book titled As Long As It Photographs It Must Be a Camera. You can find a recent interview with the artists over at American Photo.

Turning Turtles Into Cameras With Onorato & Krebs (via Photojojo)

Man Photographs Himself in a Pink Tutu to Fight Against Breast Cancer

After photographer Bob Carey moved with his wife to the East Coast in 2003, he found that life suddenly flipped 180-degrees from what he was used to. He then did what every sane, middle-aged, male photographer would do: he began photographing himself in a pink tutu to express himself. However, the project wouldn’t stay random for long. Carey writes,

Six months after the move, Linda, was diagnosed with breast cancer. She beat it, only to have it recur in 2006. During these past nine years, I’ve been in awe of her power, her beauty, and her spirit. Oddly enough, her cancer has taught us that life is good, dealing with it can be hard, and sometimes the very best thing — no, the only thing — we can do to face another day is to laugh at ourselves, and share a laugh with others.

Carey has since decided to self-publish his tutu photographs as a book titled Ballerina and then donate all the net proceeds from his work to breast cancer organizations to fight against the disease.
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Man Captures iPhone Photo of Mayan Pyramid Firing Beam Into the Sky

When Los Angeles resident Hector Siliezar visited the ancient Mayan city of Chichen Itza with his family in 2009, he used his iPhone to snap some photos of a pyramid called El Castillo. After snagging a lightning strike in the third shot, Siliezar was surprised to see that he had also captured what appeared to be a beam of light shooting up from the pyramid towards the heavens. Jonathon Hill, a researcher who works with NASA’s mars imagery, tells MSNBC that it’s probably the result of an iPhone glitch:

He says the “light beam” in the Mayan temple photo is a classic case of [image artifacts and equipment errors] — a distortion in an image that arises from the way cameras bounce around incoming light.

It is no mere coincidence, Hill said, that “of the three images, the ‘light beam’ only occurs in the image with a lightning bolt in the background. The intensity of the lightning flash likely caused the camera’s CCD sensor to behave in an unusual way, either causing an entire column of pixels to offset their values or causing an internal reflection (off the) camera lens that was recorded by the sensor.” In either case, extra brightness would have been added to the pixels in that column in addition to the light hitting them directly from the scene.

In an interview with Earthfiles, Siliezar notes that none of the people present actually saw any beam of light when the image was captured, which supports Hill’s explanation that it was simply a camera glitch.

(via Earthfiles via MSNBC via Gizmodo)


Image credit: Photograph by Hector Siliezar