Posts Tagged ‘story’

The Benefit of Researching a Subject’s Life Before Shooting a Portrait

Here’s a nice little video in which photographer Matthew Jordan Smith tells the story of a portrait session he had years ago with American actor/dancer/singer Gregory Hines. After finding himself in a sticky situation with a subject that wouldn’t offer the personality and emotion Smith wanted to capture, he reached deep into the knowledge of Hines that he had accumulated through his research; one particular fact saved the shoot.
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SF Man Feels the Fury of the Internet After Posting Photo to FB As Joke

Roberto Baldwin of Wired writes about how an SF man felt the fury of the Internet recently after pretending to be a bus-smashing rioter photographed after the SF Giants won the World Series:

The photo in question went viral pretty quickly, at least around the Bay Area. Reddit has a thread dedicated to finding the man in the photo [...] San Francisco resident Tony Lukezic saw it Monday night after some people pointed out that he looked like the vandal. “A couple of my buddies said, ‘Hey, this guy looks like you,’” Lukezic told Wired. Instead of just laughing the resemblance off, Lukezic switched out his profile picture with the offending photo and began to boast that he was indeed the bus smasher. It seemed funny right up to the point that someone took a screen grab of conversation under the profile pic and posted it to Twitter.

A few hours later, the screen grab wound up on the Facebook page of a San Francisco nightclub called Red Devil Lounge, where commenters began posting Lukezic’s phone number, information about what sort of car he drives, and pictures of him and his son. He also started receiving anonymous messages from outraged citizens.

How a Facebook Joke Made One Guy San Francisco’s Public Enemy No. 1 [Wired]


Image credit: Photograph by Susana Bates

How My Personal Photo Turned Into an Internet Meme

In 2008, I had this kooky idea to take my then 4-year-old son out to an abandoned road and throw him into the air, since it seemed most fathers like to do this with their kids. There was this long, abandoned road near my house, so we set up there. After getting my Nikon D200, self-timer, and tripod ready, my son decided that he didn’t want to be thrown into the air, so I just held him up instead. I then took another photo of myself looking up with my arms extended.
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Canadian Prime Minister Randomly Drops in on Couple’s Wedding Photos

Wedding photographers always try to prepare themselves for unexpected events and unplanned photo ops, but there’s no way photographer Laura Kelly was expecting what happened this past weekend. While photographing couple Jocelyne Potvin and Patrick Sullivan on their wedding day, an unexpected guest came in to the frame: Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper.
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Photog Documented Being Stranded in the Antarctic Nearly 100 Years Ago

If you ever need some encouragement for sticking with photography when times get tough, you should read about the adventures of Frank Hurley. Born in Australia in 1885, he took up photography as a young man and eventually became skilled enough to be selected as the official photographer for multiple expeditions to Antarctica and for the Australian military in both world wars. Among his many photographic escapades, one stands out from among the rest: being stranded in the Antarctic for nearly two years.
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Man Finds New Life as a Photographer After Being Shot and Paralyzed at Age 8

The short 4-minute-long video above is probably the most inspiring thing you’ll see today. It’s the story of Jaleel King, a man who became wheelchair-bound at the age of 8 after being shot in the back by an angry neighbor. The blast from the sawed-off shotgun almost killed him, but he fought through that challenge — and every other challenge that has presented itself since.
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How Facebook Profile Pictures Can Make a Difference in Someone’s Life

In addition to being used for art and documentation, photographs have long been a medium of communication. This is even more true in this social networking age in which photographs can easily be used to tear people down or build people up. This heartwarming video published over at Facebook Stories is a great example of the power of socially shared photos. Here’s the brief synopsis:

When a high-school athlete was blamed for a losing season, his entire school had his back. See how his classmates turned something as common as their profile pictures into an extraordinary act of support.

The whole “change your profile picture in support of a cause” thing is nothing new, but this is a pretty awesome example of it being used to make a positive difference in someone’s life.


Thanks for sending in the tip, Sam!

Famous ‘Valley Of The Shadow Of Death’ Photo Was Almost Certainly Staged

You might recognize the photograph above. Titled Valley Of The Shadow Of Death and snapped by British photographer Roger Fenton in 1855, it’s considered to be one of the oldest known photographs of warfare. Problem is, it might also be one of the oldest known examples of a staged photograph.
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A Journey from Childhood to Old Age in a Bathroom Mirror

The Mirror is a highly acclaimed and incredibly creative short film by Swiss directors Ramon and Pedro. It shows a journey through life in one take, with everything taking place in the reflection of a bathroom mirror.
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How Four Journalism Students Snagged the First Photos of the Unabomber

Vince Devlin over at the University of Montana has the fascinating story of how four UM photojournalism students snagged the first photos of Ted Kaczynski (AKA the “Unabomber”) back in 1996, beating other media organizations and making the cover of Newsweek:

He pulled up to the little media circus and found his three colleagues. No one was sure what was happening. Cars had come and gone all day, the others told Rec. No one knew if Kaczynski was there, or had been taken someplace else.

As they spoke, a white Ford Bronco came out of the trees and passed by.

The windows were tinted and you couldn’t see inside. Two local high school students who were hanging around shouted, “That’s him!” and jumped in their car.

None of the other photographers and journalists at the site took the bait. The four UM students huddled. Ely thought he could make out the silhouette of a man “with hair sticking up all over the place” in the back seat. They decided to break with the pack and follow.

Newsweek ended up purchasing 1-week exclusive rights to their highly sought-after photos for $26,000, and the images have made over $40,000 through the years.

The Unabomber Boys: 10 years ago, UM students captured first photos of reclusive terrorist [UM]