Posts Tagged ‘stills’

Did You Know: You Can Set Your GoPro to Take High Res Stills While Shooting Video

Here’s a neat GoPro feature that you might not know about: the GoPro actually has a setting where you can take video and still photos simultaneously. No, we’re not talking about pulling low-res stills out of video. We mean actually snapping high-res stills at an interval while shooting video. Read more…

Vhoto: An App That Automatically Pulls the Best Photos from Video Clips

vhoto_logo

There are times when actually creating and composing a photo are key. But, there are also times – especially to the general population – when just capturing an ‘alright’ photo is hard enough. Here to help solve this problem is a new iOS app called Vhoto, which blurs the line between capturing videos and photos.

Read more…

Montage of Students Posing Awkwardly for What Turns Out to be a Video Camera

If you need a laugh this Thursday, look no further: the Student Union of Nottingham Trent University in England has you covered with a viral video they released a couple of days ago. It’s a classic that never seems to get old: a montage of people smiling or posing awkwardly for what they think is a photo, when in fact it’s video the Student Union was shooting. Read more…

The Slanted Lens Explores Why Pulling Stills From Video is a Zero-Sum Game

In game theory, a zero-sum game is one in which one side’s gain is exactly balanced out by the other side’s loss. Regarding photography, the term works well to describe one problem with the ever-more-popular art of motion image photography, or pulling stills from very high-definition video. And in the video above, The Slanted Lens makes this point very well by testing the concept in a photo shoot using Canon’s 1D C. Read more…

Creating Still Photographs by Extracting Frames from HD Video

Are we close to the point at which HD video cameras are so good that professional photographs can simply be extracted from footage rather than shot with a still photography camera? That’s a question photographer Kevin Arnold had, and when he finally got his hands on a $65,000 RED camera he decided to seek an answer:

What I hadn’t anticipated going into this was the advantages this style of shooting would offer in terms of capturing natural expressions and key moments. Obviously, when you’re shooting 120 frames-per-second, it’s almost impossible to miss a moment. But there’s more to it. Shooting video is comparably silent and, without the constant clicking of the shutter reminding them that their every movement was being recorded, the athletes were able to forget I was there. This is huge when you’re striving for authentic, candid images, a hallmark of my work.

On the flip side, Arnold found that one of the biggest issues was achieving fast enough shutter speeds for sharp frames, as most of the frames in his videos were plagued with some kind of blur. Head on over to his blog to read his in depth exploration.

Stills, Meet Motion (via A Photo Editor)


Image credit: Photographs by Kevin Arnold

This Video Was Created Entirely in a Future Version of Photoshop

Adobe is getting serious about making Photoshop a serious tool for editing video. The sample video above was made entirely using an upcoming version of the program. Regarding why this is being added into Photoshop rather than left to Premiere Pro, product manager Bryan O’Neil Hughes states,

Video is now being generated by photographers… everyone really; the 5D Mk. II really kicked it off on the DSLR, but since then we’ve seen just about every DSLR, point and shoot and PHONE generate video… most of it HD! We did several waves of research and regularly heard, “I want Photoshop for video”; “I need a workflow I understand” and for the people who had seen what we introduced in CS3 Extended – “make that easier to use.” Video is being generated by more people than ever before; it’s being shared more places than ever… and yet people are hitting a wall with what they can do with it! They know and love Photoshop… their stills are already passing through it, the fit is more natural than it sounds at first.

You’ll soon be able to do to video just about anything do with stills: filters, adjustments, etc…

(via Adobe via John Nack)

Microsoft Application Creates Seamless 3D Models Using Photographs

We may soon be using software that can easily recreate 3D models of objects and locations using only a series of photographs taken from various perspectives. Researchers in Microsoft’s Interactive Visual Media Group have created an application that does this, generating smooth and seamless 3D views of things using photos taken while walking around the object. In the demo above, we see what the software can do with 40 images shot while walking around a car. It’s pretty amazing.

3-D Models Created by a Cell Phone (via Engadget)

A Picture of the Future with Canon Wonder Camera Concept

Canon debuted this concept camera at the Shanghai World Expo, revealing their plans for the future of photography. The concept camera, dubbed the Wonder Camera, has many functions that already exist in many cameras, but takes them a step further.

The Wonder Camera would have high-speed, multi-level focus. It would also have the ability to shoot both stills and video, but quality stills can also be taken out from individual frames of the video reel. Not only will it have face recognition, it will have smile recognition and the ability to single out those who smile out of a crowd.

It also would have super zoom capabilities, but improved built-in image stabilization to reduce the need for tripods — and perhaps eliminating the need for interchangeable lenses altogether. Canon also hopes to integrate faster wireless connectivity into the camera body.

And on top of all the features, the resolution might be measured in something much larger than megapixels — petapixels, perhaps?

Canon forecasts that a working, consumer-ready model of this camera might not exist for another 20 years, but it’s likely that we’ll see some of these features seeping into near-future consumer cameras.

You can see a video of Canon’s presentation here.

How do you think these kinds of technological changes might shape the future of photography? Let us know in the comments.

(via gizmag)