Posts Tagged ‘stacked’

Canon’s 75+ Megapixel DSLR May Use a New Stacked Three-Layer Sensor

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The photography world is abuzz with news that Canon may be planning to launch a high-end DSLR with a beastly 75-megapixel sensor. If you’re drooling over the idea of shooting photos that can span billboards, you might want to hold your horses: the sensor may not be what you think it is.
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Photo Stacking Technique Makes Clouds Look Like Brush Strokes in the Sky

Stacking long-exposure photos of stars leads to some pretty neat photos and time-lapse videos, but what happens if you use a similar technique for clouds? That’s what photographer Matt Molloy does. His “photo stack” images of landscapes show clouds that look like smears and brush strokes across the sky.
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Stacked Star Trail Time-Lapse Created with Photos Shot from Space

We’re shared a couple of “stacked star trail” time-lapse videos over the past few months (see here and here), but those videos comprised nighttime photographs taken from the ground. Photographer Christoph Malin recently decided to try his hand at the technique, but instead of using his own earthbound photographs, he used NASA photographs shot from the International Space Station. The resulting video, shown above, features the stars drawing trails across the “sky” while the Earth creates light streaks down below.
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Beautiful Time-Lapse of Long Exposure Star Trails Traversing the Night Sky

North Carolina-based photographer Daniel Lowe sent us the gorgeous video above, which shows star trails forming and floating across the sky. Most time-lapse videos of the night sky show stars as points of light, rotating around Earth’s pole. Lowe’s video shows the long streaks of star trails doing the rotating, making the video even more surreal and magical.
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Double Identity: Stacked Photographs of Identical Twins

Double Identity is a neat project by photographer Caroline Briggs in which she photographs portraits of identical twins wearing the same clothing and striking the same poses, and then overlays one on top of the other to show their similarities and differences. She writes:

My series aims to avoid direct physical comparisons between twins while allowing the viewer to acknowledge and accept the twins’ similarities and differences. For the twin, it gives them a different perspective on their double identities and poses questions about their relationship and their desire – or lack of desire – to live completely separate lives.

Briggs has the credentials to do this project — she’s a twin herself!
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Abstract Images Created by Tearing and Layering Photographs

Raleigh, North Carolina-based artist Scott Hazard creates abstract images by tearing shapes into multiple prints of the same photograph, and then stacking the images on top of each other. He uses the technique to create things such as smoke, clouds, and portals in walls. He calls the project “Photo Constructs”.
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MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Fire in the Sky: Severe Lightning Storm Captured Through Stacked Photos

Why settle for one boring lightning bolt when you can show 70+ bolts in the same photograph? Photographer Chris Kotsiopoulos of GreekSky recently shot a severe thunderstorm from Ikaria Island in Greece using a Canon 550D and 50mm 1.8 Mark II. He stacked 70 separate 20-second exposures to create the crazy image you see above.

(via Laughing Squid)


Image credit: Photograph by Chris Kotsiopoulos and used with permission

Extra Reach for Shooting the Moon

Now here’s a novel way to shoot the moon: stack five separate Canon 2x extenders to boost the focal length of your 800mm lens. Supposedly (and surprisingly) this rig actually captured a decent photograph of the moon.

This was done by the folks over at BorrowLenses, who also did the crazy filter stacking thing we featured recently. When you have as much gear as they do at your disposal, you have a wider range of ways to have fun with gear experiments.
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Stack Lightning Shots for Crazy Storms

Chris Kotsiopoulos of GreekSky made this crazy lightning photograph by stacking a large number of separate shots. He tells us,

It was past midnight when I heard from my home at Halandri, Athens an unusual rate of thunders (one every 7-8 seconds!) coming from the Olympic Stadium area 2-3 kilometers away from my home.

Without second thought, I grabbed the camera and the tripod drove quickly to the spot. I set the camera under a tent and I started taking continuous shots. I used an intervalometer so I didn’t have to be behind the camera all the time. I even took a chance by placing my self in the field of view in one of the shots. Fifteen minutes later, it started to rain and the storm was approaching, so I found shelter under the bridge at the right. Finally after 32 minutes, among the hundreds of shots taken, I captured 51 lighting strikes (9 shots where destroyed because of the excess brightness). The photo processing was fairly simple. I stacked the 42 lighting shots with Startrails software, and did some minor improvements with Photoshop.

We’re glad he took the risk of standing in his photo — it’s not often you see one of these shots with people in them. If you want to learn more about how to create this kind of photo yourself, check out this lightning shooting tutorial we posted a while back.

Atmospheric (via Gizmodo)


Image credit: Photograph by Chris Kotsiopoulos and used with permission