Posts Tagged ‘stabilization’

MoVI: A ‘Game Changing’ Stabilizer Rig for Silky-Smooth Hand-Held Video

Over the last several days, one particular piece of new gear has been getting a lot of attention as a potential “game changer” for the videographers among us. A new hand-held stabilization rig, the MoVI is a three-axis, gyroscopic, completely silent system that’s looking to revolutionize the professional stabilization market. Read more…

The Art of the Steadicam Pays Homage to Years of Stable Cinematography

Invented in the early 1970′s by cameraman Garrett Brown, the Steadicam has become a staple in the world of motion pictures. But given how frequently it’s used, most of us have lost appreciation for the true impact the camera stabilizer has made.

Knowing this (and wishing to change it) the people over at Refocused Media have put together the above compilation using famous clips from almost 50 different films — clips that may have never been attempted if it wasn’t for the Steadicam. Read more…

Fujifilm Shows Off Chicken Head Image Stabilization in Commercial

Back in 2010, we humorously reported that chickens have image stabilized heads. Some people took the idea further, turning chickens into organic Steadicams and doing further research into the subject.

Now Fujifilm has gone and turned that funny property of chickens (and certain other animals as well) into a humorous TV spot. The ad above is meant to promote the image stabilization powers of the Fujifilm X-S1 bridge camera. We delved deeper into the science behind this (called the “vestibulo-ocular reflex”) last year in this post.


Thanks for sending in the tip, Eddy!

Astronauts on the ISS Use a ‘NightPod’ to Stabilize Their Low-Light Photos

nightpod1

Astronaut photographers on the International Space Station have been beaming quite a few photographs of Earth as of late, but have you ever wondered how they manage capture relatively sharp photographs of Earth’s cities at night?

The speed at which the ISS hurtles around our planet is indeed a major challenge for low-light photography, and astronauts in the past have tried to overcome it by using high-speed film or by doing some manual tracking (which is very hit-and-miss). Luckily, space shooters nowadays have a new special tool up their sleeve: the NightPod.
Read more…

Make a DIY Bean Bag Stabilizer Using Old Jeans and Some Lentils

The bean bag is a tool that photographers sometimes use to stabilize their camera. Plop it down on a fixed platform, and the bag can do wonders for achieving sharper shots. Instead of buying a bean bag for a marked up price, you can easily create a do-it-yourself version at home. After all, it’s just some beans in a bag… Digital Camera World has a step-by-step tutorial on how you can create one using some lentils and a pair of unwanted jeans.

What’s great about using a pair of jeans, beside the fact that denim is a very durable material, is that you can cut out the crotch section — a bit strange, we know — in order to give your bean bag a built-in zipper. This makes filling the bag a breeze, and allows you to quickly change the number of beans inside to make the bag softer or firmer.

Reduce camera shake with a bag of lentils [Digital Camera World]

Nokia Caught Faking PureView Floating Lens Stabilization in Promo Video

This promo video for Nokia’s new “floating lens” image stabilization technology is causing a lot of discussion… and not for reasons Nokia should be proud about. After we included the video in a post today about the Lumia 920′s PureView camera, commenters pointed us to a post over on The Verge revealing that the video was faked.
Read more…

A Cat with Built-In Image Stabilization

A couple years ago we reported on the amazing fact that chickens have image stabilized heads, and shared some interesting “research” into using chickens as camera stabilizers. It turns out birds aren’t the only creatures with IS systems built into their hardware: cats have it too!
Read more…

How to Make a Cheap Monopod Using a Broom Handle

If you’re in need of some quick image stabilization but don’t want to shell out the $16+ dollars it takes to buy a real one, an old broom handle can do the trick. All you need besides the handle — or a 1-inch wooden dowel, or a big stick — are a hex nut and hanger bolt for the tripod mount and a spiral nail for the base. MAKE has the lowdown on how you put the ingredients together to form “the world’s cheapest monopod”.

World’s Cheapest Monopod (via Lifehacker)

Olympus OM-D 5-Axis Stabilization Tested by a Man Suffering From Hand Tremors

One of the interesting features in Olympus’ OM-D EM-5 retro-styled camera is the 5-axis image stabilization, which shifts the sensor in 5 different axis directions (existing systems generally use 2) to compensate for camera shake. It’s a feature that caught the eye of Vimeo user Fiatopichan, who suffers from essential tremor (a neurological disorder that causes his hands to shake at about 5-10 Hz). He decided to buy the camera to test out the new system, and reported his findings in the video above. The stabilization is quite impressive.

(via 43 Rumors)


P.S. Here’s a video put out by Olympus that introduces the 5-axis system.

Give Your Tripod Some Extra Stability By Adding a Weight Hook

Heavier tripods are generally more stable than lighter ones — wind doesn’t affect them as much — but hauling them around can be a pain. Instructables user Andrew Axley came up with the brilliant idea of making his simple tripod more stable by adding his own weight hook. The tripod is light when not in use and when you need extra stability you simply hang your camera bag onto the hook. All you need to do is figure out a way to attach a hook securely at the center — Axley chose to drill a hole through the side of the center column and attach an S-hook using a bolt and nut.

Tripod stabilizer weight hook (via Lifehacker)