Posts Tagged ‘spot’

Camouflage Photo Series Shows Just How Well Snipers Can Hide in Plain Sight

Featured

We spend all day staring at pixels, but really, just how good is our vision when it comes to noticing the small details in photographs? Well, I can’t speak on behalf of everyone, but using the tricky images below, you can get a good idea for yourself.

German artist Simon Menner created an interesting photo series that features military snipers hiding in various landscapes. The photos show just how well these highly trained individuals can blend into their surroundings, which vary from empty fields to rocky valleys. Read more…

Mind-Blowing TV Spot Recreates Six Iconic Images in One Uninterrupted Shot

This TV Spot is the height of creativity, and we absolutely love it. In 50 seconds and one uninterrupted flowing video shot, UK directing duo US and advertising agency Grey (the guys behind the amazing exploding spices commercial) pay tribute to six completely unique, culturally iconic images by expertly recreating one after the other. Read more…

Epic Paralympic Commercial Shot in One Take with No CGI

This amazing commercial for the Canadian Paralympic Committee was shot in one continuous take with no fancy computer-generated effects. The print ad is pretty epic as well. You can watch the “making of” video here.

Goodbye Kodachrome: Last Processing Facility Discontinues Support

After Kodak announced the end of Kodachrome’s production in June of 2009, the number of photo labs that developed the film began to dwindle until finally only Dwayne’s Photo in Parsons, Kansas remained as the lone certified Kodachrome processing facility in the world. Today, they will be processing their last roll of Kodachrome, bringing the film’s storied career in the photo industry to an end. CBS News Sunday Morning did a neat feature looking back on the popular film.

Commercial Shot at 600 Frames Per Second with 225K Watts of Light

What do 225,000 watts of light get you when shooting with the high-speed Phantom camera? Not much. Just ask Vincent Laforet who shot this commercial using the uber-expensive camera. Even with that much light, he still needed a 2.0 aperture. That only created more problems of staying in focus while using dolly moves in slow motion.
Read more…