Posts Tagged ‘sports’

Head-Mounted Cameras Capture Sports from a Referee’s Point of View

refcam

Some broadcasters around the world are starting to experiment with a new camera angle: the referee cam. By having refs on the field wear special high-definition cameras on the side of their head, the broadcasters are able to capture intense in-game footage that bring fans into the middle of the action.
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The Story Behind an Iconic Photograph of Michael Jordan in Flight

michaeljordandunkstory

You might recognize this iconic photograph of Michael Jordan flying through the air during the 1988 NBA Dunk Contest in Chicago. It was captured by renowned Sports Illustrated photographer Walter Iooss Jr., a man who has created some of the most memorable photographs of athletes over the past fifty years (another of his iconic photographs is “The Catch“).

As a followup to its ranking of the 100 greatest sports photographs of all time, the magazine caught up with Iooss to find out about the story behind this photograph.
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Sports Illustrated Magazine Accused of Manipulating College Football Photo

Last week, Sports Illustrated magazine published the above photograph by US Presswire photographer Matthew Emmons. Found in the “Leading Off” section, the photo shows the Baylor Bears football team celebrating after their upset victory over the #2 ranked Kansas State Wildcats.

The image has many people talking, not because of the unlikely event that it captures, but because it appears to be heavily manipulated. And it’s not just the fact that the picture looks like it passed through an HDR program, but that the Baylor football players didn’t wear green jerseys during that game. They wore black.
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Interview with Action-Sport Photographer Tim Kemple

Tim Kemple is an action-sport and lifestyle photographer based out of Salt Lake City, Utah. Visit his website here.


PetaPixel: Can you tell us a little about yourself and your background?

Tim Kemple: Sure. I’m a photographer and film maker based in Utah. I grew up on the East Coast and spent my weekends as a kid climbing, skiing and wandering. I started carrying a camera to document my adventures.
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The Greatest Sports Photo of All Time

This photo is the greatest sports photo of all time — at least according to Sports Illustrated. The magazine has published a gallery containing 100 of the greatest images (from an American’s perspective), and the #1 image is the above shot of Michael Jordan hitting the game-winning shot to help the Chicago Bulls beat the Utah Jazz and win the 1998 NBA Finals in 6 games.
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What It’s Like to Shoot the Conclusion of a Major College Football Game

A couple of weeks ago, photographer Mike Simons of Tulsa World covered the annual college football game between the Oklahoma Sooners and the Texas Longhorns football. Known as the Red River Rivalry, the series considered one of the greatest rivalries in American sports. To capture what photographing the conclusion of such a big game is like, Simons decided to wear a GoPro camera on his head to record a first-person point of view.
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A Glimpse Into the Hectic Life of a Reuters Photo Editor at the Olympics

As we shared last week, being a sports photographer at the Olympics is a difficult task: battling a round-the-clock schedule and a sea of competing photographers, hauling around a boatload of gear from venue to venue is just the least of your concerns.

Shooters aren’t the only ones with a difficult job, though: photo editors have it just as bad. Reuters photo editor Russell Boyce has written up a fascinating article that offers a behind-the-scenes look into the responsibilities — and mindset — of a picture editor at the Games.
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Usain Bolt Nabs Photographer’s DSLR, Snaps Awesome POV Shots

Ever wonder what it’s like to be the world’s fastest man winning a gold medal at the Olympics? Usain Bolt wants you to know.

After sprinting to victory in the 200m race today, Bolt proceeded to run over to the photographers’ pit, commandeer a Nikon DSLR from one of the photographers, and snap super wide angle views of what he was experiencing. The photographer, Jimmy Wixtröm of Aftonbladet (Scandinavia’s largest paper), left the event with memories of a lifetime and a memory card containing epic images that are the envy of many a sports photographer.
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What if Every Olympic Sport Was Photographed Like Beach Volleyball?

Nate Jones over at Metro was recently looking through Getty Images in search of Olympic beach volleyball photos, when he came upon an interesting/”gross” discovery: some of the photographs focused on the body rather than the athlete or the sport. While other Olympic sport photos focus on action and emotion, it seems that certain beach volleyball photographers are intent on snapping images of behinds.

That got Jones thinking, “what if every Olympic sport was photographed like women’s beach volleyball?” He then decided to take other shots of other sports and crop them through the lens of volleyball photographers. Here’s a sampling of the hilarious images.
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Photojournalist Uses iPhone to Cover Olympics

We’ve seen some very heavy-duty gear lugged out to cover the Olympic games in London this year: some robotic rigs, an 800mm lens that could easily weigh more than the average lady gymnast, and of course, the usual suspects in a packed camera bag. But Guardian photojournalist Dan Chung is traveling light: he’s covering the games with a simple iPhone setup.

Using different combinations of an iPhone 4s, a clip-on Schneider lens and a pair of Canon binoculars, Chung has been live-blogging all aspects of the games. His photos yield surprisingly crisp results, indoors, outdoors and even underwater through a viewing window — which again reinforces the old photographer’s adage that the best camera is the one that’s with you.

Chung uses the Snapseed app to do in-camera/phone edits. You can check out more of Chung’s work on his Guardian blog.

(via The Verge via dpreview)