Posts Tagged ‘specification’

Adobe Expands DNG Specification to Include Lossy Compression

Adobe has officially added lossy compression into the latest specification (1.4) for its Digital Negative (DNG) RAW file format. The new Lossy DNG, which first appeared as a feature in Lightroom 4 earlier this year, gives photographers a middle-ground between the quality of lossless DNG photos and the small file size of JPEG photos.
Read more…

Adobe Wants to Have Photoshop-style Blending Modes Built Into HTML

The Web Platform Team over at Adobe is currently working on bringing Photoshop-style blending modes to HTML, which would allow fancier websites and easier transitions from the company’s design tools to the web. If they succeed in publishing the spec through W3C and having it implemented in WebKit, web designers will soon be able to make use of a new CSS property called “blend-mode” that can take the same values as the blending mode drop down menu in Photoshop (e.g. normal, multiply, screen, overlay, color-dodge).

Bringing blending to the Web (via John Nack)

SanDisk and Lexar Not Planning to Jump Into the XQD Game Anytime Soon

At the end of last year a new format called XQD was unveiled as the eventual replacement for CompactFlash. About a month later at CES 2012, Sony announced the first XQD cards. If you’re not sold on the new format, here’s some good news for you: Lexar and SanDisk have both announced that they have no plans to release XQD cards in the near future and that they’re both committed to the CompactFlash format (a bit strange though, given that SanDisk was one of the companies that announced XQD in November 2010). Lexar’s actions certainly back up its words: at CES it unveiled its largest (256GB) and fastest (1000x) CompactFlash cards ever.

(via PhotographyBlog)


Image credit: 22 GB of wedding photos by John Carleton

CompactFlash Cards to Be Replaced with the Smaller XQD Format

Perhaps in response to the growing capacities and falling prices of SD cards, the CompactFlash Association has announced a new format to replace CF cards for professional photographers. It’s called XQD, and has a size that falls between CF and SD cards (it’s thicker than SD cards, but smaller than CF cards). The interface used is PCI Express, which has a theoretical max write speed of roughly 600MB/s, though the target for real-world write speeds at first will be 125MB/s. It’ll start making public appearances at trade shows early next year, and will be licenced out to card makers around the same time.

(via CompactFlash)

Nikon, Sony, and Sandisk Team Up to Design Future Memory Cards

Nikon, Sony, and Sandisk have announced that they’re teaming up to develop a set of specifications for the next generation of memory cards. The new format uses a new interface (PCI Express, previously Parallel ATA) that allows data transfer rates of up to 500MB per second. The theoretical maximum capacities of the cards would also be increased from the current 2 terabyte ceiling.

These future cards would allow photographers with future cameras to store a large number of RAW images captured with continuous burst shooting, and would also make transferring data off the card a snap. No word yet on when the future will arrive.

(via Engadget)


Image credit: Sandisk Extreme III 16GB by janandersen_dk