Posts Tagged ‘sound’

Explaining the Fascinating Photographic Trick that Lets You See Sound Waves

NPR just released a fascinating video that does a fantastic job of explaining something called Schlieren Flow Visualization or Schlieren Photography: a photographic trick that allows you to see density changes in air and, therefore, actually capture sound waves on camera.

Starting off with a simple diagram and heat as an example, producer Adam Cole breaks down how this type of photography works, after which he shows you several examples of actual sound waves captured using a high-speed camera and Schlieren Flow Visualization.

Gorgeous Food Shots in French Coffee Ad Will Leave Your Mouth Watering

I hope you don’t mind enjoying a bit of eye candy on your Tuesday evening, because that’s what you’re going to get with this video. At the direction of creative agency, Proximity BBDO Paris, coffee brand Carte Noire has a beautiful new video advert out that will tease your senses to no end. Read more…

Radiant Light: Beautiful Light Paintings Try to Capture that Which Cannot Be Seen

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Inspired by that which we cannot see — such as the shapes of sound, the feelings we experience, the relationships of the various patterns in this world, and the energy constantly emitted by matter — photographer Patrick Rochon has created a beautiful series of light-painting photographs called Radiant Light. Read more…

Chirp Lets You Send Photos from Device to Device Using Sound

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The thinking behind the new Android and iOS app Chirp is that if animals in nature communicate through sound, machines should too. And so, the four person Animal Systems team created an app that does just that: no bluetooth, no email, no ‘bumping’ — images and other files are sent using only 2-second sound clips. Read more…

Mhoto Automatically Generates Music for Your Pics Based on a Photo’s Content

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It might not be quite a trend yet, but associating sound with photos isn’t new either. Whether we’re talking about interesting photographs created with sound (like Martin Klimas’ paint photos) or about a camera that captures both sound and light, the idea of pairing sight and sound in photography has come up before.

Mhoto is a company with an idea along those same lines, only instead of capturing the sounds happening at the moment you take a photo, the company’s tech creates music based on a photo. Read more…

Eighty Dollar DIY Sound Blimp Doubles as a Poor Man’s Underwater Housing

A couple of days ago, we shared a great little DIY project by Phoenix-based photographer Dan Tabár. Since he sometimes has to shoot on quiet soundstages where camera noise is not an option, he created a makeshift sound blimp for his Nikon D800 for only about $80 — a professional sound blimp would have run him closer to $1,000.

As it turns out however, his DIY creation has another function. As you can see from the test video above, it doubles as a poor man’s underwater housing! Read more…

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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This Handheld Camera Captures Sound In Addition to Light

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You’ve probably heard of cameras that can detect wavelengths of light that human eyes can’t, and also cameras that can detect heat in a scene, but have you ever heard of one that can capture sound? That’s right: scientists at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have created a portable sound camera that’s sensitive to sound waves.
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Leica M: The Standard for Silent Shutters in United States Courtrooms

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If you’ve ever shot with a Leica M rangefinder, you probably know how effective the camera can be for stealthy shooting. After all, there’s no mirror that needs to swing out of the way like there is in a DSLR, so the main sound you’ll hear is the soft click of the shutter curtain flapping open to expose the film or sensor.

It’s not just Leica aficionados that appreciate the silent shutter: did you know that the Leica M is held as the standard for silent photography in courtrooms across the United States?
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The Speed of DSLRs and Memory Cards Measured Using Shutter Sounds

Needing a way to test the speed of memory cards, Jaroslav of Crazy Lab realized that camera shutter sounds can do the trick. By recording the sound of his Canon 600D snapping away in continuous burst mode and then viewing them audio file, he was able to visualize the card’s speed and compare them against each other. He also learned some things about burst speed and ISO/format:

As you can see, the burst length is getting shorter with rising ISO. The time camera needs to write the buffer to the card is also significantly grown. The reason is the noise. On higher ISO settings we getting more noise in picture and noisy pictures are not good for compression. The RAW-File size (black picture shouted with closed lens cap) varies from 19MB @ ISO100 to 32MB @ ISO12800.

Also interesting is the comparsion of burst speed shooting in RAW versus JPEG. While the burst length with JPEG files is virtually infinite (with fast sd-card), the burst speed is slightly lower.

You don’t need anything fancy to do this experiement: Jaroslav used a webcam mic and the free audio program Audacity.

Measuring the performance of DSLR cameras [Crazy Lab]

The Autofocus Noise of Canon’s New 40mm Pancake Lens

Canon made a splash earlier this month by announcing its first EF pancake lens, the Canon 40mm f/2.8 STM. If you’re considering this lens, one thing you should know is that the autofocus noise may interfere with your videos unless you use an external mic. In his review of the lens, photographer Dan Carr writes,

Here then is probably the biggest problem with this lens. With any other Canon lens, if you think the AF motor is making too much noise you can either switch to manual focus mode to disengage the focus motors or with Canons l-series lenses and their ultrasonic motors you simply just turn the focus ring manually yourself and it doesn’t engage the noise producing AF motor. Unfortunately though, the STM motor works in a different way [...] Even when you switch to manual focus mode, rotating the the focus ring engages the STM motor to move the lens elements as the whole thing is a focus by wire system. This means that there is absolutely no way for you to get a silent video. Whether you let the camera do the focusing, as with the new cameras like the 650D/T4i , or whether you do it yourself, you are going to get the background hum as demonstrated in my video

It’s an interesting quirk, since the STM technology is meant to provide smooth and quiet focus for video recording. It may be quiet (here’s a comparison with the 50mm f/1.8 II), but you can’t eliminate it completely. On the flip side, the lens is attracting rave reviews.

(via Dan Carr via Foto Actualidad)