Posts Tagged ‘socialmedia’

Hey Photographers! Facebook Changed Again (and this time, they want you to pay)

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It’s happened. Facebook, aka the free marketing platform we have come to know and love, now wants businesses and organizations to pay to engage with their own fans and followers. If you’ve noticed your reach and “likes” declining lately, you’re not alone. Read more…

Mom Tries to Teach Her Daughter How Fast a Photo Can Spread Online, Plan Backfires

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A Colorado mother learned an important lesson of her own last week when her plan to teach her daughter just how quickly a photograph can spread online through social media worked far too well. Read more…

Social Media Tips from Pro Adventure Photographer Lucas Gilman

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It isn’t the over 14,000 followers on Instagram or 9,000 on Twitter that made adventure photographer Lucas Gilman a finalist in the 2010 and 2013 Red Bull Illume competition (that was all his own talent), but his social media presence has helped keep him top of mind with clients and landed him a few jobs along the way. Read more…

Are Your Pics Blue Enough? How to Turn Your Photos Into Instagram ‘Like’ Magnets

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Want to get more likes on Instagram? Make sure your images are predominantly blue, spaciously cropped, bright and mildly desaturated. Read more…

Instagram Expands Banned Hashtag List: Goodbye #notassexyliciousasyou

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In an ongoing effort to control the squirming beast that is social media, Instagram recently updated its service to ban even more hashtags.
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What is it About Photographs That Makes People Click?

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Why is it that some photographs go viral online while others are left by the digital wayside? Are there certain elements in photos that make them more “sharable” to Internet users?

Curalate, a company that creates social media analytics software, decided to tackle this question by analyzing the photographs published by brands to Pinterest.
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Study Looks Into Whether Photo Websites Play Nicely with Copyright Metadata

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How well does your favorite photo hosting and/or sharing service handle the copyright information and EXIF data of your photographs? How do the popular services stack up against one another in this regard?

Metadata handling isn’t often discussed when photo sites are compared, but that’s what the International Press Telecommunications Council (IPTC) has been devoting an entire study to. The organization has published its findings regarding which companies play nicely with your metadata, and which pretend it’s not there.
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Create and Share Short Video Loops With Twitter’s New Video App ‘Vine’

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If you got on Twitter yesterday, you probably noticed an abundance of strange, .gif-like video loops. These are the result of ‘Vine,’ Twitter’s stand-alone video clip sharing app that is being called something akin to the “Instagram of Video” by more than a few online sources. Read more…

Canon Launches Its Own Forum to Give Canonites a Safe Place to Chill Online

Are you a Canonite who’s sick of hanging out in the same forums as photographers who pledge allegiance to other brands? If so, that’s kinda sad — why can’t we all just get along? — but Canon has something new that’s perfect for you. The company has just launched its own official online forum, giving photography enthusiasts a new place to “ask questions, get answers and share experiences with peers.”
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You Don’t Own Anything Anymore: Copyright Law in an Internet Age

John Herrman over at BuzzFeed has written up an interesting piece on how and why “grabby” terms of service have become ubiquitous in the online world of social media:

In a world where sharing a photo is strictly a matter of getting another copy made and mailing it, or getting it published, copyrights are pretty easy to keep track of and these laws hold up pretty well. Sending a physical photo to your grandmother goes like this: you either put the picture in an envelope and send it, or you get a copy made yourself and send that.

Sending your grandmother an email photo, though, might involve copying your photo five or six times; first to Google’s servers, then to another server, then to an ISP’s CDN, then to AOL’s servers, then to your grandmother’s computer. As far as you’re concerned, this feels exactly like dropping an envelope in the mail. As far as copyright is concerned, it’s a choreographed legal dance.

And so these sites have to get your permission — a license — to copy and distribute the things you post. Just to function as advertised, they need your permission to “use” and to “host,” to “store” and “reproduce.” What they don’t necessarily need is the right to “modify” and “create derivative works,” or to “publicly perform.” That is, unless they need to make money. Which of course they do.

You Don’t Own Anything Anymore (via APhotoEditor)


Image credit: Large copyright graffiti sign on cream colored wall by Horia Varlan