Posts Tagged ‘soccer’

Humor: Soccer Fan’s Funny Photographic Reaction to a Player Falling in Front of Him

Here’s a bit of humor to help drive away the thought that Monday is just around the corner. At a recent Liverpool Soccer match against Aston Villa, player Gabby Agbonlahor took a dive over the advertising hoardings on the side of the field and right onto the ground in front of a few Liverpool fans’ seats.

So what did the fan standing right there do? Did he try to help the beleaguered soccer player up? Did he look concerned and call for help for the player (who was probably in a bit of pain)? Of course not! Like any good photo enthusiast, he whipped out his camera and grabbed a snapshot of the scene with a look unrestrained glee on his face.

(via PetaPixel Reader Tip)

Pro Soccer Player Ponies Up $20,000 After Stomping Camera


Professional sports photographers know their equipment is always at risk, but British Getty Images shooter Richard Heathcote was still surprised and more than a bit miffed when his DSLR bit the dust at Saturday’s Hull-vs.-West Bromwich Premiere League soccer match. Read more…

Photos of Makeshift Soccer Balls Used by Children in Africa

Soccer, known as football around the world, is played by hundreds of millions of people in hundreds of countries, making it the world’s most popular sport. However, a large percentage of its enthusiasts are unable to afford actual soccer balls to play with. Instead, they fashion their own makeshift balls out of things they have on hand — things like socks, rubber bands, plastic bags, strips of cloth, and string. The DIY balls may be difficult to use and ugly in appearance, but each one is a treasured possession of its owner.

Belgian photographer Jessica Hilltout decided to turn her attention and her camera lens on these one-of-a-kind creations, documenting “football in its purest form” in Africa. The project is titled AMEN.
Read more…

Balotelli Tries to Pull a Bolt, Only Gets a Lens Hood Instead of Awesome Pictures

If you’re a superstar athlete looking to swipe a sports photographers DSLR for some impromptu picture taking, here’s a pro tip: do it nicely.

Earlier this month, Usain Bolt made headlines for some “spot news photography” at the London Olympics. After winning yet another gold medal, Bolt grabbed a DSLR from a photographer he knew and started snapping some awesome POV photos. Perhaps inspired by Bolt’s antics, soccer player Mario Balotelli of Manchester City tried his hand at swiping a photog’s camera this past weekend, but was far less successful.
Read more…

Man Chucking a $10,000 Canon Projectile

Reuters photographer Murad Sezer was shooting at an uber-important soccer final in Turkey last Saturday when he found himself in the midst of a massive clash between frenzied fans and police officers. In the chaos, fans started picking up everything they could get their hands on to use as projectiles, including camera lenses. Sezer writes,

While waiting for the trophy ceremony, the work room was packed with photographers – with evidence they had covered a riot. Broken cameras, lenses and laptops were scattered around as photographers tried to assess the damage while others tried to figure out if they were missing equipment. [...] While we were editing and sending our pictures to the Singapore desk my colleague Umit Bektas showed me a picture he took during the clashes. It was hard to believe but a fan was throwing a Canon 400mm 2.8 telephoto lens with monopod, (worth some $10,000 USD) onto the field. In that moment of truth, I knew it was a good idea to lock my 400mm in a hardcase.

Results of the Saturday night soccer violence: 3 cameras broken, 10 lenses (including a 400mm tele) damaged or missing, a laptop broken, 10 photographers directly exposed to violence.

Lesson learned: shooting a soccer match in some places can be the same thing as shooting in a war zone.

Saving the Canon 400mm f2.8 [Reuters]


Image credit: Photograph by Murad Sezer/Reuters and used with permission

How a Composite Sports Photo is Made

In this video, commercial photographer Jay P. Morgan walks through how he went about shooting a composite sports photograph of Mexican soccer player Rafael Márquez.

We were going to shoot several shots that would need to freeze him in mid air as he kicked the ball. We had limited time with him so it was necessary that things were planed out and ready to go when he arrived. We took two Hensel speed max heads that have the fastest flash duration of any mono block head available. The goal was to use them as our key lights and freeze his action in mid air. We shot background plates the day before at the ruins outside of Mexico City for him to be retouched into. The idea being famous soccer players in action shots at different iconic sites of Mexico. [#]

A video walkthrough of the post-production can be found over on Facebook.

(via Fstoppers)

Spanish Newspaper “Apologizes” for Doctoring Photo of Soccer Match

Spanish sports daily AS was forced to publish an apology earlier this week over a soccer match photo in which a player was airbrushed out. The photo was of a controversial no-call in which a Barcelona player might have been slightly offsides before receiving the ball and assisting in a goal. In the photograph published by AS, the last defender was removed, making the Barcelona player look clearly offsides.

The apology posted by the paper had the headline “Pedimos disculpas por un error en la infografía del 1-0,” which translates to “We apologise for the error in the computer graphics in the 1-0 incident”. So it seems that while they were adding in the lines and player names explaining the play, the brilliant Photoshop guru accidentally performed some Content Aware Fill mojo on that last defender. Clearly an understandable mistake, wouldn’t you say?

(via Rob Galbraith)

Behind the Scenes of the Bebe World Cup Campaign Fashion Shoot

If you’re suffering from post-World Cup withdrawal, this might cheer you up: models frolicking on a soccer field. Actually, these women are doing much more than than that in fashion photographer Giuliano Bekor’s behind-the-scenes video of the Bebe 2010 World Cup campaign. Shooting and directing by example on the turf of the Los Angeles Memorial Stadium, Bekor pushes his models to the limit. These ladies are doing things I’d certainly never attempt in a dress and stiletto heels — running on grass, for one.

(via Fstoppers)