Posts Tagged ‘snapjoy’

Dropbox Shuts Down Photo Storage Site Snapjoy Just 6 Months After Acquiring It

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Back in December, Dropbox acquired the photo storage service Snapjoy, seemingly getting ready to jump head first into the cloud sharing battle. At the time, the announcement on the Snapjoy blog rang with excitement, and even though they weren’t going to be accepting new signups, they promised that “your photos are safe!”

Well, not anymore. As of yesterday, Dropbox has officially decided to shut down the service — a decision that was confirmed by Snapjoy on its blog and through an email to all of its remaining subscribers. Read more…

Dropbox Acquires Snapjoy, Gearing Up for Cloud Photo Sharing War

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In the world of cloud data storage, Dropbox is one of the 800lb gorillas fighting for your files. In recent days, it has been making big moves to become more of a player in photo storage and sharing. After all, everyone needs a safe place to keep their digital images, right?

The company’s latest play came today in the form of an acquisition: Dropbox has acquired fellow cloud-storage company Snapjoy — a business based around aggregating photos from around the web and from your various devices.
Read more…

Time-Lapse of the Colorado Wildfires

Dustin Henderlong of Snapjoy shot this time-lapse video last week of the massive Colorado wildfires from his 5th-floor office window. He used a Canon 5D Mark III, 50mm f/1.4 lens, an intervalometer, and an A/C adapter to continuously snap photos from 3pm Tuesday to 10am Thursday.

(via Doobybrain)

250,000 Photos Flee Flickr on Flickraft Before Plug is Pulled

Cloud-based photo hosting service Snapjoy launched a clever web app (and marketing ploy) yesterday called Flickraft that made it easy for Flickr users to rescue their photos “from a sinking ship”. With just a few clicks, the app would import a user’s entire collection of Flickr photos over to Snapjoy using the Flickr API. The response was overwhelming: in just two hours, Flickr users had exported over 250,000 photos from their accounts. The app became so popular that Flickr disabled the API key used by it, likely for violating its terms of use. This short-lived exodus came roughly one week after Yahoo was blasted for laying off a number of Flickr employees.

(via The Next Web via TechCrunch)