Posts Tagged ‘slowmotion’

Ethereal Slowmo BASE Jumping Shot with GoPro and Slowed with Twixtor

Melbourne-based design studio Betty Wants In is at it again. They’ve created this stunning slow-mo video of BASE jumpers doing their thing — a perfect followup to the skydiving one they shared back in April. The footage was captured with GoPro cameras and then slowed down using Twixtor, just like the crazy wingsuit video we shared yesterday.

Insane Wingsuit BASE Jump in Slow Motion with Twixtor

Earlier this year, daredevil BASE jumper Jeb Corliss leaped off a cliff in Switzerland in a wingsuit and wearing 5 separate GoPro cameras. One of the things Corliss did afterward was create this ethereal slow-motion video with the footage using Twixtor, the artificial slowmo program that has become quite popular as of late.
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Eagle Owl Attacking Camera at 1000fps

While we’re on the topic of high-speed cameras (and slow motion videos), here’s a beautiful slow-motion video of an eagle owl “attacking” a camera, shot at 1,000fps with a Photron FASTCAM SA2. The new Phantom v1610 camera announced today can record footage 1000 times slower than this.

(via kottke.org)

New Phantom v1610 Camera Can Shoot a Staggering 1,000,000fps

Shooting 4.5 million frames per second of molecules using an x-ray flash is impressive, but can non-scientific cameras come anywhere close? The answer is yes: Vision Research has a new Phantom high speed camera called the v1610 that can capture footage at a whopping 1,000,000fps. Granted, the resolution needs to be a paltry 128×16 for that fps, but at a full 1280×800 it still shoots at 16,000fps. To give you an idea of what 1 million fps is like, consider this: 1 second of the footage will provide you with 9.25 hours of uber-slow motion 30fps video.

Phantom v1610 (via PopSci)

Vibrations Invisible to the Human Eye Shot at 1,000 Frames Per Second

Vibration tester manufacturer Fluke recently published this video showing what the world of vibration looks like at 1,000 frames per second.

So much of movement is invisible to the human eye. Sure, our eyes can see a cymbal move when struck by a drum stick. But it’s what our eyes can’t see that is most captivating. Metal rippling as if it were fabric fluttering in the wind, droplets of water bouncing and hovering just above the surface of a puddle; the beauty and science of movement is in the details. And the details are often the result of vibrations. [#]

Everything was shot using a Phantom HD Gold high speed camera.

(via Laughing Squid)

Capturing a Bullet in Slow Motion Using an Ordinary DSLR

When Eadweard Muybridge shot the first motion picture of a galloping horse back in 1878, he used 24 individual cameras placed 27 inches apart, using trip wires to fire off each camera one thousandth of a second after the previous one. With fancy high-speed camera rentals priced at thousands of dollars a day, YouTube member Destin came up with a Muybridge-esque technique for capturing a bullet flying through the air using an ordinary DSLR: he shoots a bullet for each frame and uses a fancy trigger to capture the bullet at increasing distances, combining the resulting images into a neat super slow motion video.

(via DIYPhotography.net)

Canon 18-55mm Kit Lens Aperture Blades in Slow Motion

Here’s an interesting look at what the aperture blades on a Canon 18-55mm (the kit lens for many DSLRs) look like. The video above shows the blades moving into position at 120fps. This happens every time you shoot a photograph and in the blink of an eye.
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Ethereal Slow Motion Skydiving Captured with GoPro and Slowed with Twixtor

Melbourne-based design studio Betty Wants In captured some skydiving footage using a GoPro HD camera and then slowed it down with Twixtor for an ethereal faux slow-motion video of skydivers floating through the heavens.

Canon and Nikon Mirror and Shutter Comparison in Slow Motion

Here’s a video comparing the mirror and shutter curtain mechanisms of the Canon 5D Mark II, Canon 7D, Nikon D700, and Nikon D7000 DSLRs. It’s pretty surprising how much the Canon mirrors bounce compared to the Nikon ones…

(via Foto Actualidad)

Once in a Lifetime Surfing Shot Captured with a High Speed Camera

The Roman philosopher Seneca once said, “Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.” This clip from the BBC documentary “South Pacific” shows Rudi Diesel capturing a once in a lifetime shot of surfer Dylan Longbottom in a massive 12-foot wave using a Typhoon HD4 high speed camera. It’s the first shot of its kind ever recorded, and one of the most amazing surfing shots you’ll ever see.

The pseudo-slow motion surfing video we shared yesterday compared to this one is like comparing 2D to 3D.

(via f stoppers)