Posts Tagged ‘slowmo’

Capturing a Bullet in Slow Motion Using an Ordinary DSLR

When Eadweard Muybridge shot the first motion picture of a galloping horse back in 1878, he used 24 individual cameras placed 27 inches apart, using trip wires to fire off each camera one thousandth of a second after the previous one. With fancy high-speed camera rentals priced at thousands of dollars a day, YouTube member Destin came up with a Muybridge-esque technique for capturing a bullet flying through the air using an ordinary DSLR: he shoots a bullet for each frame and uses a fancy trigger to capture the bullet at increasing distances, combining the resulting images into a neat super slow motion video.

(via DIYPhotography.net)

Canon 18-55mm Kit Lens Aperture Blades in Slow Motion

Here’s an interesting look at what the aperture blades on a Canon 18-55mm (the kit lens for many DSLRs) look like. The video above shows the blades moving into position at 120fps. This happens every time you shoot a photograph and in the blink of an eye.
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Ethereal Slow Motion Skydiving Captured with GoPro and Slowed with Twixtor

Melbourne-based design studio Betty Wants In captured some skydiving footage using a GoPro HD camera and then slowed it down with Twixtor for an ethereal faux slow-motion video of skydivers floating through the heavens.

Canon and Nikon Mirror and Shutter Comparison in Slow Motion

Here’s a video comparing the mirror and shutter curtain mechanisms of the Canon 5D Mark II, Canon 7D, Nikon D700, and Nikon D7000 DSLRs. It’s pretty surprising how much the Canon mirrors bounce compared to the Nikon ones…

(via Foto Actualidad)

Slow-Mo Surfing Shot with a Canon 7D

Devin Graham shot this beautiful surfing footage using a Canon 7D and a couple lenses (70-200mm and 100-400mm) with a 2x teleconverter, so much of the footage was shot at 800mm. The slow motion is actually “faked” (here’s another faked 7D video) using software:

To get the “super slow motion”, after I filmed at 60fps, I through it into the program “After Effects”. I used an effect that comes with the program called “Time Warp”. This allowed me to make the 60fps, to 1000fps. The way this works is the computer processes/adds frames in between the frames that are already in existence. It took several days for the computer to process the clips into the super slow motion that appears as well, so it does take a lot out of the computer, as far as processing goes.

Using After Effects or Twixtor to create fake slow mo is becoming a pretty popular technique. Beats shelling out big bucks to rent a high speed camera for many purposes.

(via Gizmodo)

Nikon D3 Aperture Blades and Shutter Curtain in Super Slow Motion

Here’s an interesting glimpse into what a DSLR’s aperture blades and shutter curtain look like in super slow motion. Specifically, it’s a Nikon D3 shooting at 11 frames per second with 1/4000 shutter speed and f/16, all captured at 5,000 frames per second. What’s amazing is that the shutter curtain moves so quickly that you can’t see the sensor at all, even at 5000fps!

Music Video Shows 7 Seconds from a High-speed Train Played in Slow-motion

Last year we featured a pretty neat slow motion video shot from a moving train. British band SixToes decided to use the same idea for a music video, placing people all along the platform doing various things, and slowing down 7 seconds of footage into an entire music video.

The idea could be improved on by having what’s happening on the platform reflect what’s being sung in the song, but would require tons of planning and perfect timing — though the end product would be totally mind-boggling.

(via Small Aperture)

Random Experiments at 2,564 Frames per Second with a Phantom Flex

Tom Guilmette was doing a project in Vegas that involved a Phantom Flex high speed camera when he decided to experiment with 2,564 frames per second in his hotel room. This is the resulting video showing his random experiments.

Even ugly things in life (like dropping your phone) are beautiful in super slow motion.

(via Engadget)

Camera Flash Bulb Shot at 1052FPS

Ever wonder what you camera flash would look like if you watched it in super slow motion? Thanks to Phantom high speed cameras you can wonder no more! This flash bulb (the single-use kind used in old film cameras) was captured at 1052 frames per second.

(via f stoppers)

Match Igniting at 2000 Frames per Second

This is what lighting a match looks like up close and in super slow-mo at 2000 frames per second. Who knew the process was so bubbly and gross?

(via Laughing Squid)