Posts Tagged ‘slowmo’

Nikon D3 Aperture Blades and Shutter Curtain in Super Slow Motion

Here’s an interesting glimpse into what a DSLR’s aperture blades and shutter curtain look like in super slow motion. Specifically, it’s a Nikon D3 shooting at 11 frames per second with 1/4000 shutter speed and f/16, all captured at 5,000 frames per second. What’s amazing is that the shutter curtain moves so quickly that you can’t see the sensor at all, even at 5000fps!

Music Video Shows 7 Seconds from a High-speed Train Played in Slow-motion

Last year we featured a pretty neat slow motion video shot from a moving train. British band SixToes decided to use the same idea for a music video, placing people all along the platform doing various things, and slowing down 7 seconds of footage into an entire music video.

The idea could be improved on by having what’s happening on the platform reflect what’s being sung in the song, but would require tons of planning and perfect timing — though the end product would be totally mind-boggling.

(via Small Aperture)

Random Experiments at 2,564 Frames per Second with a Phantom Flex

Tom Guilmette was doing a project in Vegas that involved a Phantom Flex high speed camera when he decided to experiment with 2,564 frames per second in his hotel room. This is the resulting video showing his random experiments.

Even ugly things in life (like dropping your phone) are beautiful in super slow motion.

(via Engadget)

Camera Flash Bulb Shot at 1052FPS

Ever wonder what you camera flash would look like if you watched it in super slow motion? Thanks to Phantom high speed cameras you can wonder no more! This flash bulb (the single-use kind used in old film cameras) was captured at 1052 frames per second.

(via f stoppers)

Match Igniting at 2000 Frames per Second

This is what lighting a match looks like up close and in super slow-mo at 2000 frames per second. Who knew the process was so bubbly and gross?

(via Laughing Squid)

Beautiful Hand-Tossed Water Sculptures in Super Slow Motion

Forget throwing water balloons at people’s faces — if you ever get your hands on a super expensive slow-motion camera, tossing around water is awesome enough. Shinchi Maruyama is an artist that photographs hand-tossed liquid sculptures using a Phase One P45 camera and a Broncolor Strobe. He also used a high-speed camera to capture video of sculptures being “made”. The results are beautiful.

Shinchi Maruyama (via A Photo Editor)

NASA Space Shuttle Launch Shot with Super Slow Motion Cameras

When a NASA Space Shuttle lifts off, there’s always high definition cameras carefully placed around the launch site, documenting the launch in high-definition photographs and slow motion videos. Back in April we featured a slow motion video of the Apollo 11 launch in 1969, and now here’s another neat super slow-mo documentary of more recent launches (i.e. 2005). If you have 45 minutes to spare, this video is sure to amaze and educate you.

By the way… during the launch, the shuttle burns 1,000 gallons of liquid propellants and 20,000 pounds of solid fuel every second.

(via Engadget)


Update: Ben tells us that every single image in the video above was shot on film, not HD cameras.

Slow Motion Footage Shot From a Train

Graeme Taylor took his Casio High Speed EXILIM EX-FH20 camera and shot some 210fps footage out the window, resulting in some pretty beautiful slow-motion footage. On his blog Taylor writes,

In all my slow-motion work so far, I’ve used a static camera to capture a high-speed event. But, I wondered, what would happen if the camera was the fast-moving object? For instance, if you use a 210fps camera at 35mph, on playback at 30fps it’ll seem to the observer that they’re moving at walking pace- but everything observed will be operating at 1/7th speed.

What I’d hoped to do was film the people on a railway platform from a train as it blasted past, but since the places they don’t stop at tend not to be listed in the timetables, this would be hard to co-ordinate. I figured that being at the very front of a fast train as it approached a stop would suffice; although the ‘frozen in time’ effect is less pronounced towards the end of the video, the platforms at non-stops tended to be mostly empty, so there’d be less to capture anyway. Helpfully, people don’t seem to move too much as their train arrives!

Now someone needs to take this idea to the next level with a Phantom camera and a bullet train.


Thanks for the tip Luke!

Steel Ball and Sand in Slow Motion

Another entry for our list of “random things made awesome by slow motion”: here’s a video of a steel ball being dropped into fine sand heated to about 500° C, at which point it takes on strange liquid properties. Be sure to also check out the water drop at 2000 fps video we posted in the beginning of the year if you haven’t seen it.

Popcorn Popping Captured at 6200 FPS

Here’s something to add to your list of “random but awesome things to shoot if you ever get your hands on a Phantom camera”: popcorn popping. The exploding kernel above was shot at 6200 frames per second with a Phantom v12 and played back at 25fps.

(via Laughing Squid)