Posts Tagged ‘skype’

Photo Projects That Made For A Better 2013

Acknowledging the photo projects of 2013 that stand testament to the power of the still image

Sarah Jacobs · Dec 13, 2013 · 4 Comments » ·

Photographer John Clang and Skype Join Forces to Make You Cry… In a Good Way

Back in July, we told you about a heartwarming Skype campaign called “Stay Together.” Inspired by photographer John Clang’s viral photo series Being Together, the company got in touch with Clang to see if he would help them create a campaign/contest, the winner of which would be reunited with their distant friend or relative. Read more…

Heartwarming Skype Campaign Digitally Reunites People for Family Portraits

Skype recently embarked on a touching ad campaign called Stay Together in which they use photography and the magic of the Internet to reunite families that live on opposite sides of the world by creating “impossible family portraits.” Read more…

Skype Adds Simple Photo Sharing to Its iPhone and iPad Apps

If you’ve been looking for a way to hold “photo conversations” with friends and family as easily as you chat through text messages, Skype has a solution for you. The company has added one of the features requested the most by its millions of users: mobile photo sharing. Upgrade to the latest version of Skype’s iPhone and iPad apps, and you’ll be able to beam your latest snaps to anyone on your contact list without having to worry about things like file size limits or paying for MMS charges.
Read more…

Futuristic Family Portraits Involving Skype Projections

In many Asian cultures it’s common for families to gather together for formal portraits on special occasions, but this tradition is becoming much harder to coordinate as more and more young people are moving abroad for work. Photographer John Clang has a new series of photographs that features an interesting solution to this problem: Skype webcam projections. Clang visited various individuals around the world and had them video chat with family members in Singapore. By projecting the feed onto a wall and having the entire family pose, Clang shot traditional-style family portraits with the subjects separated by thousands of miles.
Read more…