Posts Tagged ‘signs’

Community-Sourced Photos of New York City’s Diverse Signage

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New York City offers a plethora of photographic opportunity. Massive architecture alongside a vibrant and diverse population makes for plenty of work for photographers of all types. But have you ever thought about the myriad signage and typography that New York has to offer?

Matthew Anderson and Daniel Hunninghake did, and so they created NYCType back in 2007 to highlight it. The site brings together photos of New York City’s signage under once virtual roof. Read more…

Massive Photo Collage Creatively Depicts Every Street Sign in Manhattan

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Photographer Jacob Kedzierski first came up with the idea to create a street sign collage eight years ago while riding a bike around the streets of his hometown of North Tonawanda, NY. After completing that project and moving to New York City, the idea for a Manhattan version crossed his mind several times, but he was never ready to commit to the amount of work it would take to actually get it done.

That was until he offhandedly mentioned that he was “working on” a Manhattan version at a local print shop. The owners had liked his North Tonawanda collage and when he mentioned Manhattan they offered him a spot in the front gallery area for when the project was done. He finally had his motivation. Read more…

Portraits with Witty Hand-Painted Signs

Artists Anna Gray and Ryan Wilson Paulsen have a two-year-long project titled 100 Posterworks that features B&W portraits in various locations, with standard compositions, featuring witty messages on hand-painted signs.

Through the posters we address philosophical questions, comment on political or artistic issues, quote, complain, poke fun and indirectly document our lives. They can be read as a kind of cumulative (and often contradictory) artist statement.

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Photographs of Urban Landscapes with All Traces of Text Removed

The Untitled Project” by photographer Matt Siber features urban scenes with all traces of text stripped away and reconstructed in a separate frame. Siber shot the original images in North America, Europe, and China over the past nine years.
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