Posts Tagged ‘shadow’

Photos of Diet Wiegman’s Mind-Blowing Shadow Sculptures

02 Shadow Dancing ©Diet Wiegman

Voted “The Most Brilliant Artist of the Netherlands” in 2009, Dutch artist Diet Wiegman is a master of his craft. But of all the amazing creations he has to his name, his work with light and shadow is most breathtaking. Using garbage, pieces of glass and other rubble, he creates a sculpture that, with the help of a light source, projects a beautiful image onto a wall. Read more…

Fantasy Photographs of Children Living in the Reflection of a Pond

reflections-10

For his project titled Reflexion Autour du Bassin, French photographer Alain Laboile created fantasy photographs of his children, seen through the reflection of a small pond.
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Total Solar Eclipse Time-Lapse Captures Shadow Sweeping Across the Land

Last month, there was a total solar eclipse that was visible to people in Australia. Photographer Colin Legg captured the whole thing as three separate time-lapse videos (seen above). The short but beautiful clips show the moon passing in front of the sun, a darkness sweeping across the vast landscape, and the moon’s shadow sweeping across the sky!
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Clever Photos of People Casting Intricate Shadows With Their Bodies

Earlier this year, we shared the photos of Tim Noble and Sue Webster, London-based artists who are well known for creating amazing shadows using piles of carefully arranged objects. Perhaps inspired by their work, photographer Julian Wolkenstein shot a clever series of photographs a couple of years ago that show three people contorting their bodies in various ways to create intricate shadows on the wall behind them. The project is titled, Nova.
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First Photograph of an Atom’s Shadow

This image might look like some kind of screenshot from an old 16-bit video game, but it’s actually the first photo ever made of an atom’s shadow. Researchers at Griffith University in Australia suspended a ytterbium atom in midair, shot it with a laser beam, and then used a Fresnel lens on the other side to snap a photograph of the dark shadow left by the atom. Scientist Erik Streed has a writeup explaining how they accomplished it and the project’s implications for other research.

Snapping an atom’s shadow? Now that’s a first (via Engadget)


Image credits: Photograph by Kielpinksi Group/Centre for Quantum Dynamics

Space Shuttle Smoke Plume Shadow Points to the Full Moon

During a 2001 launch of the Space Shuttle Atlantis, NASA photographer Pat McCracken captured this amazing photograph of the shuttle’s smoke plume casting a shadow across the full moon rising in the horizon.

[...] the Sun, Earth, Moon, and rocket were all properly aligned for this photogenic coincidence. First, for the space shuttle’s plume to cast a long shadow, the time of day must be either near sunrise or sunset. Only then will the shadow be its longest and extend all the way to the horizon. Finally, during a Full Moon, the Sun and Moon are on opposite sides of the sky. Just after sunset, for example, the Sun is slightly below the horizon, and, in the other direction, the Moon is slightly above the horizon. Therefore, as Atlantis blasted off, just after sunset, its shadow projected away from the Sun toward the opposite horizon, where the Full Moon just happened to be. [#]

Talk about a one-in-a-million shot…

(via PhotoWeeklyOnline)

14-Year-Old Boy May Have Captured First Photo of Shadow Cast by Jupiter

While most 14-year-old boys are hooked on things like video games, Laurent V. Joli-Coeur is busy using astronomy and photography for crazy science projects. A few months ago, he had the crazy idea of photographing a shadow caused by Jupiter’s light. He then spent 7 hours building an instrument to do so, and used a Nikon D700 and 60mm Macro lens lent to him by Nikon to capture the image:

I took three photographs to prove that Jupiter could indeed cast a shadow. The first one, a five minute exposure at ISO1600 with an in-camera dark subtraction, was taken to photograph a shadow: the results were conclusive. Indeed, after stretching the image in Pixinsight, the gnomon’s shadow was clearly visible on the projection screen (a gnomon is the object that creates the shadow on a sundial). However, this wasn’t enough to prove it was Jupiter’s. The second exposure was taken to prove that the light causing the shadow came from the sky, not from the instrument itself: I slightly moved the mount in right ascension, expecting the shadow to move sideways… And it did. The third and final exposure was taken in a region of the sky far away from Jupiter. As the last image showed no sign of the gnomon’s shadow, I concluded that the only possible explanation for the shadow in the first two images was Jupiter!

As far as Joli-Coeur knows, it’s the first photo of a shadow cast by Jupiter ever made. You can find a more detailed account of his experiment on his blog.

The Quest for Jupiter’s Shadow (via Bad Astronomy)

Volcano Casts a Giant Shadow Across Clouds at Sunrise

Tumwater, Washington resident Nick Lippert captured this amazing photograph of Mt. Rainier casting a long shadow across low hanging clouds. It was shot at 7:40 in the morning using a Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS3. Talk about being in the right place at the right time…

Check out the full-res version here (it makes for a great wallpaper). KOMO News also has a gallery containing more photos from this particular morning.

(via KOMO News via Discover via Coudal)

AP Sacks Photographer for Cloning His Shadow Out of an Image

The AP has sacked photographer Miguel Tovar for “deliberate and misleading photo manipulation” after Tovar cloned out his own shadow from a feature photograph. The Photoshopping came to light after an alert photo editor spotted a strange looking dust pattern in a photo of Argentinian children playing soccer.
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