Posts Tagged ‘sf’

Shooting on the Streets of San Francisco for 24 Hours Straight

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I have driven through San Francisco many times for business and pleasure, and have always been intrigued by how its energy constantly changes depending on the time of day. Glimpses of tall structures casting shadows, observing lighting and framing scenarios, and colorful people performing urban rituals often seen from my periphery had an affect on me.

These glimpses inspired me to undertake a 4am to 4am 24-hour-long project to capture unaltered reflections hour-by-hour how the city, the traffic, lighting, commerce, and ultimately the people change… or do they?.
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How I Created a Series of Matching ‘Sexy’ Engagement Photos that Went Viral

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I bought a used Mamiya RZ67 Pro II a month ago, a huge medium format studio SLR with a negative area a full five times larger than the sensor on a Nikon D800 or 5DMKIII “full frame” camera.

A decade ago, the kit I bought would have sold for 5 figures, but thanks to film’s loss in popularity, I was able to get it for less than a tenth of what it cost new.
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SF Man Feels the Fury of the Internet After Posting Photo to FB As Joke

Roberto Baldwin of Wired writes about how an SF man felt the fury of the Internet recently after pretending to be a bus-smashing rioter photographed after the SF Giants won the World Series:

The photo in question went viral pretty quickly, at least around the Bay Area. Reddit has a thread dedicated to finding the man in the photo [...] San Francisco resident Tony Lukezic saw it Monday night after some people pointed out that he looked like the vandal. “A couple of my buddies said, ‘Hey, this guy looks like you,’” Lukezic told Wired. Instead of just laughing the resemblance off, Lukezic switched out his profile picture with the offending photo and began to boast that he was indeed the bus smasher. It seemed funny right up to the point that someone took a screen grab of conversation under the profile pic and posted it to Twitter.

A few hours later, the screen grab wound up on the Facebook page of a San Francisco nightclub called Red Devil Lounge, where commenters began posting Lukezic’s phone number, information about what sort of car he drives, and pictures of him and his son. He also started receiving anonymous messages from outraged citizens.

How a Facebook Joke Made One Guy San Francisco’s Public Enemy No. 1 [Wired]


Image credit: Photograph by Susana Bates

Beautiful Photos of a Double Rainbow All the Way Over San Francisco

San Francisco residents were treated with a dazzling sight yesterday: a double rainbow all the way across the sky, visible from many parts of the city. The San Francisco Chronicle writes,

The mist mixed with golden light from the low-slung sun to cast a beautiful pink glaze across downtown skyscrapers. Thousands at the Giants baseball game took their eyes away from the game to gawk at a double rainbow that formed over center field, perfectly framed by the grandstands. “There was just some very light rain at the game, but it was amazing to see so many people bringing out their iPhones and taking a picture of it,” said Mike Pechner, a forecaster with Golden West Meteorology who was at the game. Dozens of motorists pulled their cars to the side of the road to gawk and take pictures of the rare double-rainbow, created when the light refracted through the moisture in the air.

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Dizzying Animations that Show What San Francisco Looks Like to Superman

Director Kevin Parry recently finished creating a music video for the song “Water Falls” by Kalle Mattson. Filmed by Andrea Nesbitt, the video features some crazy time-lapse shots over great distances in San Francisco. Parry has also turned the shots into these animated GIFs that show you what various locations would look like if you were Superman whizzing around.
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200 Yards: A Photo Project Documenting SF Through a Hyperlocal Lens

200 Yards is a neat photo project based in San Francisco that centers around the idea of having photographers point cameras at a small section of a particular city. For each cycle, organizers pick a particular “alternative gallery space” and invite photographers to create photographs within a 200-yard radius of that location (this translates to roughly one block in each direction). Submissions are then whittled down until 12 photographers remain, and these artists are invited to the resulting exhibition at the gallery space.

200 Yards (via Photojojo)

The City: A Beautiful Time-Lapse Portrait of San Francisco

“The City” is a beautiful time-lapse video that gives you a taste of what San Francisco is like. Between June 2010 and August 2011, photographer Wesley Townsend Kitten visited various locations in the city, capturing 85 different shots comprising roughly 28,000 photographs. He used a Canon 5D, Canon 5D Mark II, 15mm fisheye, 16-35mm, and 70-200mm for the shots, which were subsequently tweaked in Lightroom. Everything was then brought together into this time-lapse video using Final Cut Pro.

(via Laughing Squid)

Tilt-Shift Time-Lapse Transforms San Francisco into a Miniature City

Shukhrat of MINIMUS DESIGN created this time-lapse video of his favorite places in San Francisco, using a tilt-shift effect to make them look like miniature models. It reminds me of “The Sandpit“, a similar video done in New York City that went viral on the web back in February.


Thanks for the tip Stefan!

A Dynamic Time-Lapse Visualization of the Sky for an Entire Year

A History of the Sky is an ambitious project by San Francisco-based artist Ken Murphy that aims to create a gigantic mosaic of 365 time-lapse videos of the sky – one for each day of the year.

Time-lapse movies are compelling because they give us a glimpse of events that are continually occurring around us, but at a rate normally far too slow to for us to observe directly. A History of the Sky enables the viewer to appreciate the rhythms of weather, the lengthening and shortening of days, and other atmospheric events on an immediate aesthetic level: the clouds, fog, wind, and rain form a rich visual texture, and sunrises and sunsets cascade across the screen.

Currently a work in process, Murphy uses a camera installed on the roof of the Exploratorium in San Francisco to capture a photograph of the sky every 10 seconds. The photographs from each day are then combined into a 6-minute time-lapse movie.

Once the project is complete, the 365 time-lapse movies will be combined into a mosaic, with each of the movies playing in parallel. Since the time of day in each movie is the same across all the movies, the viewer is able to see the graduate shifting of sunset and sunrise times.

To get a sneak peek of what the final result will be like, check out this video created with 126 days:

Murphy’s next step is to build a display for the project using a set of HD monitors arranged side by side.

I want viewers to be able to stand back and observe the atmospheric phenomena of an entire year in just a few minutes, or approach the piece to focus on a particular day.

If you’d like to support his efforts, he’s created a project on Kickstarter to raise funds for this display.