Posts Tagged ‘sensorshift’

Olympus to Make 40MP Sensor Shift Photos Possible During Handheld Shooting

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One of the main innovations found in the new Olympus OM-D E-M5 II is its ability to shoot massive 40MP photos with its 16MP sensor by doing “sensor shifting” and combining multiple shots. The main downside, however, is that you need a tripod to make sure the camera doesn’t move between shots.

That may soon change: Olympus says its working on making the sensor shift technology work even when the photographer is shooting handheld without stabilization.
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Olympus OM-D E-M5 II is a 16MP MFT Camera That Can Shoot 40MP with Sensor Shifting

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Olympus has announced the OM-D E-M5 II, the successor to the popular E-M5 that shook up the industry back in 2012 with its retro styling. It’s a 16MP Micro Four Thirds camera that boasts a special high resolution shot feature that uses sensor shifting to capture 40MP images.
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Rumor: The Olympus E-M5II Will Use Sensor Shift to Capture 40MP Photos with a 16MP Sensor

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Some hugely innovative news is coming out of the Olympus rumor mill today. According to highly trusted sources, the followup to the Olympus OM-D E-M5 will take a page out of Hasselblad’s multi-shot book and, using its sensor shift capabilities, spit out 40MP images from its 16MP sensor! Read more…

Sony Patent Shows Off Z-Shift Sensor That Can Change Flange Distances On-The-Fly

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Most cameras are limited in a number of ways due to the fact that their sensor is integrated into the camera body and unable to move on any axis. However, a new patent by Sony shows that they might be looking to change that in their future systems. Read more…

Nikon’s Reasons for Lens Stabilization Over Sensor-Shift Stabilization

Nikon has a support page for people who wonder why the company hasn’t added sensor-shift image stabilization to its DSLRs. The first point is that stabilizing the image before it enters the camera allows the user to see exactly what the sensor “sees” through the viewfinder, and allows the autofocus and metering sensors to take advantage of this stabilized image as well. Secondly, they state that they can optimize the system for each lens to achieve finely tuned stabilization that gains extra stops of light over sensor-based systems.

Why is ‘in-lens’ VR superior to ‘in-camera’ VR? (via Nikon Rumors)