Posts Tagged ‘sensor’

That Photon Hitting Your Camera Sensor Took Thousands of Years to Arrive

sensorlight

How long does it take for a photon from the Sun to reach your camera sensor (or film) and help form a photograph? If you answered “8 minutes,” you’d be kind of right, and but also kind of wrong. An answer that’s more correct is “at least tens of thousands of years.”
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New Camera Sensor 1000x More Sensitive Than Current Sensors

NTU Graphene Sensor 1

Researchers at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have developed a graphene image sensor one thousand times more sensitive to anything available on the market today. The sensor is capable of detecting broad spectrum light, making it a great solution for all types of cameras. Its uses could include traffic cameras, infrared cameras, and so forth.
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Researchers Discover How to Capture 3D “Ghost” Images Without a Camera

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A team of researchers at the University of Glasgow’s School of Physics and Astronomy just published a paper in Science that details how they managed to use an altered style of “ghost imaging” photography to create accurate three-dimensional images. Read more…

Tiny OmniVision Sensor Brings 1080p/60 Video to Front-Facing Smartphone Cams

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The all-mighty selfie has gained a lot of ground over the years — even the Mars Rover Curiosity is doing it — but high-quality has never been its trademark. This is due, in part, to the horrible quality of most front facing smartphone cameras. Having to sandwich a sensor between a whole mess of other stuff leaves little to beef up quality.

OmniVision aims to solve that space issue, and it’s doing so by packing a whole lot of power into an itsy bitsy sensor: the newly announced OV2724. Read more…

DxOMark’s Leica M9 Sensor Test Results Have Leica Photographers Befuddled

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If you’re a fan of Leica’s digital rangefinders and have been skeptical of DxOMark’s ability to determine sensor quality through its rigorous tests, you might want to skip over the lab’s newly published test results on Leica’s M series sensors.
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Flexible Transparent Sensor Could Some Day Revolutionize Digital Cameras

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A new breed of image sensor is being created by researchers at Johannes Kepler University in Linz, Austria that may some day revolutionize the way we take pictures. Unlike the typical image sensor we’re used to seeing, this one is a thin, flexible, transparent sheet. Read more…

What a DSLR’s CMOS Sensor Looks Like Under a Microscope

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Jack over at the astrophotography blog The Landingfield has published a series of photographs showing what a digital camera’s CMOS sensor looks like when viewed through a microscope. The sensor (seen above) was taken from a broken Nikon D2H — a DSLR from back in the early 2000s.
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Panasonic Doubles Color Sensitivity in Sensors with ‘Micro Color Splitters’

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Panasonic is claiming a major breakthrough in the world of camera sensors, saying that it has doubled the color sensitivity with a new technology called ‘Micro Color Splitters.’
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“To Omit an Alias Filter… Is like Building a Sports Car with No Brakes”

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Last week, we pointed you to a piece by the New York Times on how Fujifilm is attempting to kill moiré without killing sharpness by designing its sensors in a way that eschews the traditional anti-aliasing filters used in digital cameras. Photographer Martin Doppelbauer disagrees with Fuji’s claims: he has published a piece arguing that, “digital cameras without aliasing filters are cameras with a built-in design flaw“:

To omit an alias filter in front of a digital image sensors is like building a sports car with no brakes. Of course, the car accelerates a little faster due to the lower weight and the cornering ability is also better due to the smaller unsprung weight – but ultimately it lacks an essential functional element.

For analog cameras, an alias filter is not required: ​​Film has no sharply defined limit of resolution. It loses contrast and resolution gradually with increasingly higher frequencies. You could say, the low-pass filter is already incorporated in the film itself.

[…] By omitting the alias filter, the recorded image information […] does not increase! Even though images of cameras without aliasing filters may appear sharper and crisper: Images of cameras with a proper alias filter can easily be re-sharpened to achieve the same visual impression – without side effects.

So according to Doppelbauer, the recent fascination with removing anti-aliasing filters is more based in marketing rather than science.

Alias-filters: Yes or No? [Martin Doppelbauer]

Ricoh GR Digital V to Feature an APS-C Sensor

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It may not be the most popular series of compact cameras, but the Ricoh GR Digital line has attracted a sizable cult following of photographers around the world — particularly street shooters. From the time the original GRD was announced at Photokina 2004 until the most recent GRD IV, the cameras have offered smaller 1/1.77-inch CCD sensors. That will soon change: a trusted source tells us that the Ricoh GR Digital V will feature a larger APS-C sensor.
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