Posts Tagged ‘sensor’

Samsung Debuts ISOCELL Sensor Tech, Promises up to 30% More Dynamic Range

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Although the pixel war probably isn’t ending anytime soon, a new sensor technology from Samsung shows how yet another company is focusing on improving the tech instead of stacking the spec sheet.

We’ve seen amazing low-light sensors and dual-pixel AF tech from Canon, organic sensors with insane dynamic range from Fuji and Panasonic, and now new ISOCELL technology from Samsung, which promises substantial increases in color and light sensitivity. Read more…

Firefly Footage Captured in 0.01 Lux with Canon’s Amazing Low Light Sensor



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Back in March, Canon announced that it was working on a special 35mm low-light sensor that would blow away all other competition when it came to seeing things in near complete darkness. In order to further prove that point, the company sent a prototype out to shoot tiny fireflies in less than 0.01lux on Japan’s Ishigaki Island. Read more…

Photog Turns His DSLR Monochrome by Swapping Out the Sensor

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Earlier this month, we showed you how some astrophotographers were turning their standard DSLRs monochrome by physically scratching the color filter array off of their sensor in order to get sharper black-and-white photos.

Another photographer is doing something similar, only instead of scratching off the color array and possibly doing damage to the sensor, he decided to swap out the sensor entirely. Read more…

Sony Patent Shows a Camera Sensor and LCD Screen That Rotate Together

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Want to shoot portrait-orientation photographs while holding your camera in landscape mode? Sony appears to be tinkering with a way to do just that.
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Scratching the Color Filter Array Layer Off a DSLR Sensor for Sharper B&W Photos

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In October 2012, astrophotographer Raymond Collecutt of Whangarei, New Zealand shared a new (and risky) idea he was playing around with: converting a standard DSLR into a sharper monochrome camera for photographing space.
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Canon’s 75+ Megapixel DSLR May Use a New Stacked Three-Layer Sensor

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The photography world is abuzz with news that Canon may be planning to launch a high-end DSLR with a beastly 75-megapixel sensor. If you’re drooling over the idea of shooting photos that can span billboards, you might want to hold your horses: the sensor may not be what you think it is.
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Nikon Patent Solves Camera Overheating by Integrating Removable Heat Storage

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As DSLRs become more and more capable video capture machines, the problem of overheating becomes a more pressing one. With RAW video in particular, where the amount of data being captured is staggering, the sensor needs to be protected if you expect to keep using the camera for any extended amount of time.

Cinema cameras, like Canon’s 1D C, have attacked this issue in the past by arranging the internals in such a way as to provide better cooling. But a couple of new Nikon patents take a different approach. Read more…

That Photon Hitting Your Camera Sensor Took Thousands of Years to Arrive

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How long does it take for a photon from the Sun to reach your camera sensor (or film) and help form a photograph? If you answered “8 minutes,” you’d be kind of right, and but also kind of wrong. An answer that’s more correct is “at least tens of thousands of years.”
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New Camera Sensor 1000x More Sensitive Than Current Sensors

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Researchers at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have developed a graphene image sensor one thousand times more sensitive to anything available on the market today. The sensor is capable of detecting broad spectrum light, making it a great solution for all types of cameras. Its uses could include traffic cameras, infrared cameras, and so forth.
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Researchers Discover How to Capture 3D “Ghost” Images Without a Camera

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A team of researchers at the University of Glasgow’s School of Physics and Astronomy just published a paper in Science that details how they managed to use an altered style of “ghost imaging” photography to create accurate three-dimensional images. Read more…