Posts Tagged ‘selfportrait’

Bathtub Self-Portraits in Bizarre Locations

Japanese photographer Mariko Sakaguchi has a curious self-portrait series in which she photographs herself sitting in a bathtub in all kinds of random locations, which range from business offices to lecture halls.
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One Self-Portrait a Day Since 1999

Toronto-based photographer Jeff Harris started a photo-a-day project back in 1999 in an effort to document his life through self-portraits. Since then, he has captured 4,748 beautiful photographs that show everything from reckless stunts to a fierce battle with cancer (warning: there’s a graphic image). Harris states,

I didn’t want 365 images of me sitting on the couch each day. There could have been that tendency, especially during the cold dark winter months to stay inside all the time, but this project inspired me to get out there and seek out interesting things.

[...] I see no reason to not make a self-portrait each day. I’m always around and always free. It’s kind of like going to the gym—it flexes your muscles and keeps you in shape. [#]

Harris is entering the 14th year of his project this year, and although his body is far from being the same as when he started this endeavor, his great photographic vision is still evident in each of his images.

Jeff Harris (via Time via zefrank)

Composite Self-Portrait Made Using 500 Photographs of One Face

Inspired by Noah Kalina’s viral everyday video a girl who goes by clickflashwhirr has been doing a similar self-portrait-a-day project. Designer Tiemen Rapati decided to make a composite image showing what the average of the self-portraits looks like. Taking 500 images from clickflashwhirr’s Flickr set, Rapati wrote a script that counts the individual RGB values for each pixel, averaging them across the 500 portraits.
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Crazy Photo Project: One Self-Portrait Every Hour, For an Entire Year

Daily photo projects have become quite popular as of late, and a number of viral time-lapse videos feature people who take one self-portrait a day over many years. However, if you think taking a photo every day requires a crazy amount of dedication, you ain’t seen nothing yet.

For an entire year, from April 11, 1980 through April 11, 1981, legendary performance artist Tehching Hsieh punched a time clock and took a self-portrait every hour (i.e. 24 times a day) on the hour. At the end of the year, he ended up with 8,760 photos and combined them into a time-lapse video showing the passing of a year (and the growth of his hair). Now that’s crazy!


Thanks for sending in the tip, Lloyd!

A Mirror Self-Portrait Taken 200 Miles Up

Here’s a photograph we’ve all taken… only in our bathroom mirror. NASA astronaut Michael Fincke shot this photograph with what looks like one of the Nikon DSLRs on board using a reflective-portion of the International Space Station. This means he shot a self-portrait roughly 200 miles above the ground while zipping around the planet at 17,000 mph.

Endeavour’s Final Mission (via Photojojo)

How to Look Good in Self-Portraits Using the Power of Angles

Samsung created this humorous ad a couple years ago teaching how you can take better self-portraits of yourself for social media profile pictures. It all has to do with harnessing the power of angles.

Start a Self Portrait per Day Project with New Everyday App

After Noah Kalina published his “Everyday” video back in 2006 featuring a self-portrait a taken every day for 2,356 days, the concept took off and soon the Internet was filled with copycat projects by people who wanted to document their own lives in the same way. If you’ve been wanting to try you hand at taking a photo of your face every day but have lacked the discipline to do so, there’s a new app for the iPhone called “Everyday” that is designed to make things easier for you.
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Self-Portrait in the Tip of a Ballpoint Pen Using a Modified Canon PowerShot

This crazy self-portrait was taken using the tiny reflection in the tip of a ballpoint pen. Russian photographer Alexey Arkhipov modified a Canon PowerShot S1 IS, adding a custom (and cheap) lens setup to achieve this super-macro shot. Head on over to his blog post if you’d like to learn how it was done and how to do this yourself (you might have to use Google Translate).

(via Make)