Posts Tagged ‘science’

The Science Behind Tintype Photography

Here’s another video featuring SF photo shop Photobooth and its tintype portraits. Will and Norm of Tested talk to shop owner Michael Shindler, who goes in depth into how tintype photographs are created and the science behind the process.

Startling Portrait Offers Visual Proof that Sunlight Causes Premature Aging

If you’ve never been a fan of using sunblock, here’s a photograph that might change your feelings toward it. Shot by doctors Jennifer Gordon and Joaquin Brieva of Northwestern University and published by the New England Journal of Medicine, the photo shows a 69-year-old truck driver who exhibits a strong case of photoaging. In the 28 years he spent driving trucks, the man’s face received far more sunlight on the left side with the sun streaming in through the driver’s side window.

(via NEJM via Business Insider)


Image credit: Photograph by Jennifer Gordon/Joaquin Brieva/NEJM

What Night Sky Photographs Will Look Like Over the Next 7 Billion Years

NASA astronomers announced today that they are certain that our galaxy is on an unavoidable collision course with the Andromeda Galaxy, the closest spiral galaxy to us. Don’t worry though, it won’t be happening for another 3.5 billion years or so. What’s interesting is that the collision will drastically change what our night sky looks like, and the astronomers released a series of photo illustrations showing what future astrophotographers will be shooting when they point their cameras at the heavens.
Read more…

Flashed Face Distortion Effect Makes Ordinary Portraits Look Hideous

If you ever create a slideshow of portraits, you might want to avoid showing them aligned side-by-side with a gap in between. The video above shows a crazy optical illusion that researchers have dubbed the “Flashed Face Distortion Effect”. By flashing ordinary portraits aligned at the eyes, the human brain begins to compare and exaggerate the differences, causing the faces to seem hideous and ogre-like. Researcher Matthew Thompson writes,

Like many interesting scientific discoveries, this one was an accident. Sean Murphy, an undergraduate student, was working alone in the lab on a set of faces for one of his experiments. He aligned a set of faces at the eyes and started to skim through them. After a few seconds, he noticed that some of the faces began to appear highly deformed and grotesque. He looked at the especially ugly faces individually, but each of them appeared normal or even attractive.

Read more…

The Frozen Face Effect: Why You Look Worse in Photos than in Video

If you’ve always felt that you look more attractive in videos than you do in photographs, you’re not alone. A recent study done by researchers at UC Davis and Harvard has found that subjects generally find video footage of people more attractive than stills showing the same face. It turns out that looking attractive in photos is no easy feat due to what the researchers are calling the “frozen face effect.”
Read more…

Camera Phones Used for Augmented Reality Presentations in London Museum

Typically, augmented reality falls somewhere between technological breakthrough and really cool thing to show your friends; but in the Science Museum in London’s Making of the Modern World exhibit, augmented reality also takes up the mantle of education.

Using the $3 Science Stories app, visitors to the museum can point their iOS or Android devices at markers set in front of particular exhibits, and prompt a 3-dimensional James May (one of the hosts of BBC’s Top Gear) to appear and explain the particulars of the display. Read more…

Photograph the Left Side of People’s Faces to Capture More Emotion

Everybody has had pictures taken that they can hardly stand to look at. Even professional portraits that eliminate blemishes and show you in attractive poses sometimes look strained, or emotionless. Well, a recent study published in Experimental Brain Research seems to say that the remedy could be as easy as turning the other cheek.
Read more…

What Landscape Photos Would Look Like if Earth Had Saturn-Like Rings

YouTube user Roy Prol created this fascinating animation that imagines what Earth would be like if our planet had Saturn-like rings. In addition to views from space, he show us beautiful renderings of what the rings would look like in landscape photos captured at famous landmarks (e.g. the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro) around the world.

MIT Unveils Camera That Can See Around Corners

Back in 2010 we shared that MIT was developing a special camera that uses echoes of light to see around corners. Now, two years later, the researchers are finally showing off the camera in action. It works by firing 50 “femtosecond” (quadrillionth of a second) laser pulses 60 times at various spots at an angled wall. A special imaging sensor then collects the scattered light that’s reflected back and uses complex algorithms to piece together the scene based on how long the photons take to return. The process currently takes several minutes, but researchers hope to reduce it to less than 10 seconds, which would make it more useful for military and industrial applications.

(via Scientific American)

Composite Image of Titanic on the Ocean Floor Created From 100,000 Photos

Researchers have created the first comprehensive image of the entire 3×5-mile debris field around the sinking of the Titanic:

Compiled from more than 100,000 photos taken by underwater robots, the composite image shows the world’s best remembered shipwreck in strikingly sharp detail. Although much of the debris is hidden, you can see how the ship split apart and tell by the debris that they hit the ground violently. In just over a month — April 15 — it will have been a century since the ship hit an iceberg and sunk to the bottom of the Atlantic.

(via The Atlantic via Photographs on the Brain)


Image credit: Photograph by RMS Titantic Inc.