Posts Tagged ‘science’

Engineering Photography Beautifully Reveals the Intersection of Science and Art

engineer1

From images of graphene flowers and foam to a portrait of a self-taught engineer fixing one of his elephant pumps that is providing clean water for a village in Malawi, the winning images and other impressive entrants in the University of Cambridge Department of Engineering’s photography competition beautifully illustrate how art, science, and humanity mesh. Read more…

A Simple Explanation of the Optics Behind Pinholes, Camera Apertures, and Your Eye

If you’ve never thought to find out why aperture works the way it does, you should definitely check out this simple explanation of optics, aperture and pinholes by MinutePhysics. Read more…

This 4K Time-Lapse of the Sun Features the Largest Sunspot in the Past 22 Years

James Tyrwhitt-Drake recently combined over 17,000 images captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory and Helioviewer.org to create a time-lapse showing the largest sun spot of the past two solar cycles — that’s roughly 22 years!

Read more…

Scientists Dress Camera Rover as Baby Penguin to Get Up Close and Personal with Emperor Colony

penguin1

Trying to record and gather data on very shy animals like emperor penguins is a big challenge for scientists. Getting close to them, even with remote-controlled rover cameras, often scares them or makes them act differently.

So, how do you solve this? If you’re Yvon Le Maho and his team from the University of Strasbourg in France, you dress the rover up as a fuzzy penguin chick before sending it on its way. Read more…

Photography and the Feelings of Others: From Mirroring Emotions to the Theory of Mind

Processed with VSCOcam with m6 preset

Photography is powerful because we can place ourselves into the perspective of those we see in an image. Whether it’s street photography, photojournalism or portraiture, we use photography to understand ourselves in relation to people around us.
Read more…

Colorful Abstract Macro Photographs Created by Injecting Watercolors Into Ferrofluid On a Magnet

ferr1

Artist Fabian Oefner‘s project Millefiori is, like most of the projects we’ve ever shared by him, a mixture of science and art. By combining vibrant watercolors with a magnetic solution called ferrofluid, he was able to create these gorgeous macro photographs of the paint and ferrofluid interacting on top of a magnet. Read more…

The Macropod is a $20,000+ Rig That Makes Macro Photography Stupidly Easy to Do

macropod

Macro photography is a wonderful tool for scientists and researchers, but the complex nature of capturing detailed, focus-stacked macro images of everything from insects to the human tongue puts the tool out of reach of many.

The Macropod photographic system solves this by making the entire process both portable and automatic, and producing some of the sharpest, most striking macro photographs we’ve ever seen. Read more…

Your Future Smartphone Camera May Be Able to See Cancer Thanks to the Mantis Shrimp

shrimp

Mimicking animal and bug vision to create unique and interesting cameras is nothing new. Bug vision cameras with, for example, infinite depth of field, have been made in the lab before. But researchers at University of Queensland in Australia are developing a camera that can do something pretty unique: it can see cancer.

The idea came after the scientists discovered that mantis shrimp have this incredibly useful ability. Read more…

Can You Spot a Fake Smile in a Photograph?

fakesmile

“Smile” is a common command uttered before pressing the shutter and snapping a photo, but it’s not always a real smile that gets captured in the resulting portrait. How well can you distinguish a “real” smile from a “fake” one in a picture?

In the two portraits above, which one is a genuine smile, and which one is more forced?
Read more…

This Spaceship Selfie Was Taken 250 Million Miles from Earth and Features a Comet Photobomb

spaceselfie1

Here’s an amazing “selfie” photograph that’s literally out of this world. It was captured a couple of days ago by the Rosetta mission, which is studying a comet over 250 million miles away from Earth on behalf of the European Space Agency (ESA).
Read more…