Posts Tagged ‘satellitephotos’

40 Years of Landsat: Time-Lapse Videos Show Changes to Earth’s Face

Yesterday marked the 40th anniversary of Landsat, the longest-running program focused on acquiring satellite photos of Earth. The Landsat satellite snaps one completely photo of the Earth’s surface every 16 days, and the petabytes of photos collected over the years have given scientists a view into how our planet’s surface has changed over time, whether by natural or human-caused means. Google is currently working to make the photos easily enjoyable by the general public by transforming them into time-lapse videos.
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Satellite Photographs Showing the Rapid Spread of Humans Across the Earth

2008 marked the first time in history that more of Earth’s population lived in cities rather than in the countryside, and by 2050 nearly 70% of the world’s population will reside in large cities. A new series of satellite photographs captured decades apart by NASA’s Landsat department and the U.S. Geological Survey offers a striking look at how human cities have spread across the face of the Earth in just a few short years. The image above shows Las Vegas in 1984 and in 2011.
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Billionaire “Watermarks” Satellite Photos of Persian Gulf Island

Don’t want people using photos of your private island without permission? Watermark it! Billionaire Hamad bin Hamdan Al Nahyan had his name carved into the sand of his island in the Persian Gulf. The giant “HAMAD” is two miles long and half a mile tall, is partially filled with water from the Persian Gulf, and can be clearly seen in photographs of the region capture by satellite. Gives new meaning to the term “watermark”, eh?

(via Forbes)


Image credit: Photograph by Google Imagery, DigitalGlobe, Cnes/Spot Image, GeoEye, U.S. Geological Survey

Satellite Photographs Being Used to Cheat at Corn Mazes

This has got to be one of the saddest uses of imagery ever. The Daily Mail is reporting that iPhone owners in the UK are using satellite photos and GPS to cheat at getting out of corn mazes. By seeing their current location in a birds-eye view of the maze, visitors can quickly solve even the most challenging corn mazes.

Adventure seekers usually spend anything up to 90 minutes getting lost in the Hedge Maze at Longleat Safari Park, Wiltshire, before finding the exit.

But staff at the attraction have noticed people are working their way round the labyrinth of two miles of pathways and 16,000 yew trees in just a matter of minutes.

The idea is clever, but super lame. Can you think of anything else that satellite imagery can help you cheat at?

iPhone cheats crack Britain’s biggest hedge maze in minutes (via Wired)


Image credit: Cheating in the maze by Andrew*