Posts Tagged ‘rover’

Google Maps is Officially Out of This World, Will Let You Explore the Moon and Mars

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In honor of the Mars Curiosity Rover celebrating its second year on the martian surface, Google has released an incredible little resource into Google Maps. Now, you will be able to more thoroughly explore the surface of the moon and Mars than has ever been capable before. All from the confines of your seat.

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Mars Curiosity Rover Commemorates One Martian Year Anniversary by Taking a Selfie

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Last Tuesday, on June 24th, NASA’s Mars Curiosity Rover marked the one Martian year anniversary since it touched down on the red planet and began exploring. And what better way to commemorate this occasion when you’re alone some 57+ million miles away home than by taking a selfie? Read more…

Previously-Unseen Photos Show NASA Using Hawaii as an Apollo Testing Ground

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How are these Apollo 17 astronauts riding around in their buggy on the moon without their spacesuits? You might wonder. Well, they’re not. This photograph, captured in 1971, shows the astronauts taking their buggy for some field training test drives on Hawaii’s Big Island. Read more…

Mars Rover Curiosity Takes Its First Photo of Earth from the Surface of the Red Planet

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Someday, when the first humans walk on Mars — after they’ve taken a commemorative “one small step for man” selfie, of course — they will turn their iPhone 27’s back towards Earth and snap a photo of their home planet that might look something like the image above. Read more…

Mars Rover Opportunity Commemorates 10 Years on Mars by Sending Home a Selfie

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When the Mars Rover Opportunity landed on our planetary neighbor on January 25th, 2004 it was undertaking a three-month mission. Well, it’s a full decade later and the little guy is still alive and kickin’ (in a robotic kind of way).

And what better way to celebrate that achievement then by taking a good ol’ fashioned, 2014-like selfie? Read more…

Video: NASA Gives a Tour of the Cameras on the Mars Curiosity Rover

The Curiosity Rover has been trekking the surface of Mars since late last year, and so far, there has been no shortage of great imagery.

But what gear is behind those intriguing images we see so frequently? NASA JPL has put together a short video on the camera equipment on board the Curiosity rover. Read more…

Nine Month Time-Lapse of Photos Taken on Mars by the Curiosity Rover

NASA’s Mars Curiosity Rover has sent down a constant stream of images from the Red Planet. Ever since it landed on August 8th, 2012, it’s spent every spare moment snapping selfies, panoramas and surveillance footage, and sending it back home from between 33.9 and 250 million miles away (depending on the relative positions of Mars and Earth).

The majority of Curiosity’s photos that get picked up by the press are taken by the Mars Hand Lens Imager and Mastcam, but Curiosity is actually taking pictures each and every day. Equipped with Front Avoidance Hazard Cameras or “Hazcams,” the rover has been snapping black-and-white images ever since it landed, and one YouTuber has decided to stitch all of those images into a time-lapse. Read more…

Curiosity Shoots First Nighttime Photos on the Surface of Mars

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NASA’s Curiosity rover quietly accomplished another photographic first today. This time it was the first nighttime photographs captured on the surface of the Red Planet.
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An Arm’s-Length Self-Portrait Captured Millions of Miles Away

Facebook users here on Earth aren’t the only ones shooting arm’s-length self-portraits: NASA’s Curiosity rover over on Mars is doing it as well! Curiosity captured the image above a couple of days ago using its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), which is attached to an extendable robotic arm. The image is actually a composite of 55 separate photos shot using the 2-megapixel RGB color CCD camera.
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1909 Lincoln Penny Used to Calibrate the Mars Curiosity Rover’s Camera on Mars

Did you know that there’s US currency on Mars? It’s true: when NASA’s Curiosity rover was launched back on November 26, 2011, one of the things it carried with it was a penny from over a century ago. The 1909 Lincoln cent is part of the rover’s onboard calibration target used to check that the cameras are working properly.
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