Posts Tagged ‘rollei’

Buy a One-of-a-Kind Transparent Rolleiflex Prototype Camera for $6,000 Over on eBay

rollei1

Camera collectors, unfold your wallets… it’s time for another installment of “cool rare things currently on eBay.” Except in this case ‘rare’ can be replaced with ‘unique,’ as in these cameras are supposedly one-of-a-kind.

What you see above is a prototype, one-or-a-kind transparent Rollei Rolleiflex 6008 AF. Even the serial number is ‘PROTOTYP.’ And the same store is also selling a 6001, 6003, 6008 Integral, and 6008 Integral 2. Read more…

Rolleiflex Still Happily Making Analog TLR Cameras, FX-N to Debut at Photokina

Did you know that Rolleiflex is still producing its high-end analog twin-lens reflex cameras? Apparently there’s enough photographers out there buying them for there to be a small, niche market, because Rollei is planning to show off a new model at Photokina 2012 next week.

The FX-N is a 6×6 medium format TLR camera that is an updated version of the Rolleiflex FX, a camera that costs over $5,000. The only difference it has with its predecessor (or sibling) is that it features a new Heidosmat 80mm f/2.8 viewfinder lens and a Rollei S-Apogon 80mm f/2.8 main lens that offer a shorter minimum focusing distance of 55 centimeters.
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Makeshift EVF Using a Rollei Viewfinder

Hong Kong photographer Lok Cheung found that manual focusing his Olympus E-P1 Micro Four Thirds camera was a pain because it lacked an electronic viewfinder (EVF). He then discovered that attaching a Rollei TLR viewfinder to the camera provided a makeshift EVF:

The result is really good. Although the LCD on E-P1 is not in very high resolution and you can see every single pixels with the Rollei viewfinder, manual focus is almost as fast as you can get on a true manual camera, and the viewfinder is almost directly behind the lens which even closer to SLRs and rangefinder.

LCD viewfinder attachments already exist for DSLR systems, and help make focusing easier and more precise by magnifying the LCD screen and blocking out sunlight. Using a film viewfinder to do this for an Olympus E-P1 is pretty clever.

(via Engadget)


Image credits: Photographs by lok cheung