Posts Tagged ‘rogercicala’

A Brief Comparison of Canon 400mm Lenses, Mark I Against Mark II

canon400mm

Canon shooters have a bit of 400mm excitement right now. The biggest news, of course, is the release of the 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 IS II lens, replacing the original version that’s had a very long, successful run.

Not quite so much excitement was generated by the release of the 400mm f/4 DO IS II lens. It too replaces a long running lens, but one that has been considered more of a niche lens. (I’ll admit, though, it’s been one of my favorite niches. I used the 400mm DO a lot over the years.)
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Cracking Open the 7D Mark II, The Most Thoroughly Weather Sealed Camera I’ve Ever Seen

7dteardown1

OK, I have to admit I really like the 7D Mark II. I didn’t want to because it wasn’t what I wanted. I wanted to see the new Canon chip foundry that would be cranking out high-resolution sensors. But despite wanting to hate the 22-megapixel APS-C camera, after a fairly short exposure to the autofocus system, I have to admit I like it. There’s just something about getting every shot in focus every time that’s appealing to me. Read more…

About That 25-300mm f/2.8 You Wanted

mythicallens

I get an email or text about once a month asking me if I think Canon, Nikon, or some other photo manufacturer will ever make something like a 25-300mm f/2.8 zoom lens. I’m usually gentle with those people, because I realize that a lot of people truly believe that if they want something badly enough, someone could make it for them. Occasionally, someone exhibits the Dunning-Kruger Effect and tells me that they know it’s a plot on the part of the manufacturer’s to make us buy multiple lenses instead of just one that could do everything.

I had another one of those emails a few days ago, so I thought it might be interesting to show everyone what a 25-300mm f/2.8 would (approximately) look like.
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The Itsy Bitsy Spider: A Tiny Spider Made Itself at Home Inside This Lens

lensspider

We spend a lot of time over at Lensrentals getting dust out of lenses. Dust doesn’t affect an image, except in very rare circumstances, but people want their rental lenses to look nice and clean inside and out, and our inspectors check the inside of every lens with spotlights and send any dusty ones over to the repair department. Read more…

A New Old Lens

Giving Lomography's Petzval lens the full Photo Geek treatment.

Jul 09, 2014 · Roger Cicala

Sensor Stack Thickness Part III: Summary

Single glass piece from the sensor stack of a Canon (left) and Micro 4/3 (right) camera. Image credit: Aaron Closz.

Single glass piece from the sensor stack of a Canon (left) and Micro 4/3 (right) camera. Image credit: Aaron Closz.

Well, I have to admit this has been a fun series. I’ve learned a whole lot. That’s what makes this so fun — I get some results I don’t understand, get some help figuring out what is going on, and before I know it, I’ve learned something that explains other things I haven’t been able to understand. Read more…

Sensor Stack Thickness: When Does It Matter?

Single glass piece from the sensor stack of a Canon (left) and Micro 4/3 (right) camera. Image credit: Aaron Closz.

Single glass piece from the sensor stack of a Canon (left) and Micro 4/3 (right) camera. Image credit: Aaron Closz.

The first post I made on sensor-stack thickness wallowed deeply in PhotoGeekery. This one is meant to be of practical use so I’ll try to leave the Geek stuff out. We’ll start with the simple facts. Read more…

Glass in the Path: Why Using Adapters May Hurt Your Image Quality

NOTE: This is a Geek Post. If you aren’t into geeky photo measurements, or into adapting lenses from one brand of camera to another, you’ll not be interested.


Single glass piece from the sensor stack of a Canon (left) and Micro 4/3 (right) camera. Image credit: Aaron Closz.

Single glass piece from the sensor stack of a Canon (left) and Micro 4/3 (right) camera. Image credit: Aaron Closz.

A year or two ago, I wrote a blog post where I basically showed lenses shot on adapters on other cameras aren’t acceptable for testing. If you run them through Imatest the results aren’t accurate. I suggested that reviewers shouldn’t test lenses on adapters, although obviously adapters are a great way to use interesting lenses to take pictures. Read more…

Disruption and Innovation

The disruptive innovations that change the landscape of photography are often overlooked. Or worse, feared.

Feb 11, 2014 · Roger Cicala

LensRentals Cracks Open the Sony A7R, Gives Us a Peek at the Electronic Goods

The usual warnings apply:

  • Do not try this at home. This post was made by semi-trained, semi-professional repair technicians who sort of know what they’re doing.
  • The following blog post contains graphic images of the inside of a very nice camera. If such things make you squeamish, don’t read further.
  • No cameras were harmed in the making of this blog post. The camera has been fully reassembled and is functioning normally.

a7rteardown1

Ever since we here at LensRentals first tested a Sony A7R, we were dying to take a look under the hood. Say what you will about Sony as a company, but they create some of the most elegantly-engineered camera bodies we’ve seen. Plus, the A7R is something of a groundbreaking camera, and we wanted to see how they crammed all that stuff into its little body.

Oh, and finally, we’ve wanted a closer look at how thick the cover glass over the A7R’s sensor is, since there is some evidence that it may affect the edge performance of certain adapted lenses. Read more…