Posts Tagged ‘robot’

Hexo+ Autonomous Camera Drone Lets the Adrenaline Junkies Film Their Own Stunts

Adrenaline junkies who want to capture their stunts on video have thus far been limited to two options. They either had someone else photograph/film them, or strapped an action cam to themselves for some first person point of view shots. Now, thanks to Hexo+, they have a third option: have your autonomous drone film you from above. Read more…

Pic Nix Lets You Anonymously Make Fun of Your Instagram Friends… Using a Robot

We all have those friends. The ones that post ridiculous amounts of the most cliché Instagram photos. If only there was a way you could somehow point this out to them, anonymously and with a healthy dose of passive aggression… Well, now there is (or rather was… see update) thanks to a service called Pic Nix. Read more…

‘Face Cartography’ Captures Portraits at a Whopping 900 Megapixels

Using an industrial–strength robotic arm, custom software, a Canon EOS Mark ll and a 180mm macro lens converted into a telecentrical lens, Swiss photographer Daniel Boschung has created an automated portrait machine. Made to map out “Face Cartography“, the machine and resulting images capture incredibly detailed and hyperrealistic photographs of subjects. Read more…

Pitting a Remote Controlled Nikon Against a Curious Pride of Lions

A few days ago it was a National Geographic robot camera rig vs. a tiger, today we swap out the tigers for a pride of lions and the Nat Geo rig for “Car-L,” a little remote-controlled ‘buggy’ packing a Nikon D800E. Read more…

Steve Winter Gets Up Close and Personal with a Curious Tiger Using a Robot Rig

National Geographic photographer Steve Winter is a big on the big cats. After all, he was willing to spend 12 months chasing after the perfect mountain lion shot. In the video above, he didn’t have to exhibit that sort of patience, instead he had to control a finicky robotic camera rig as best he could and try to snap some awesome photos of a curious tiger. Read more…

Pixy: A Low Cost Camera that Recognizes and Follows Objects by Color

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Camera technology is always being used/tweaked in one way or another to yield surprising or novel results. In some cases, that means creating a camera that sees like a bug’s eye. In others, one that perceives only motion, like a retina.

The most recent camera innovation we’ve stumble across falls a bit closer to the second of those. It’s called Pixy, and it’s a color-detecting camera that might some day soon be the eye with which your friendly neighborhood robot sees and interprets the world. Read more…

Photographing Serengeti Lions Up Close Using Infrared, Robots and Drones

National Geographic photographer Michael “Nick” Nichols has spent the last few years in the Serengeti capturing NatGeo-worthy, one-of-a-kind photos of lions. The amazing photos that illustrate the story Serengeti Lions in this month’s issue of the magazine were all taken by Nichols, and in the video above we get a tiny peek at how he managed to get such unbelievable views. Read more…

photoBot: A Photog Robot That Scans the Room for Pictures, R2-D2-Style

photoBot is a new photography robot designed by Tommy Dykes, a designer and PhD student at Northumbria University. It constantly scans a room for photo ops by turning its head in a manner reminiscent of R2-D2 from Star Wars (which, in case you haven’t heard, is now owned by Disney).
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The Fancy Robotic DSLR Rigs Covering the Olympic Games

This behind-the-scenes video by the Associated Press gives a neat look at the various robotic cameras the agency will use at the London Olympic Games (earlier this month we shared some of Reuters’ rigs). Fancy remote-controlled rigs will allow for many photographic firsts, as cameras will be found in locations that were previously inaccessible. Wired writes that despite their usefulness, robotic cameras are causing some human photogs to sweat:

“We are essentially able to put cameras and photographers where they’ve never been before, capturing images in ways they’ve never been captured,” [Fabrizio] Bensch said. “For example, I’ve installed a robotic camera unit on a truss, 30 meters high — in a position where no photographer has been in a previous Olympics.”

For [Mark] Reblias, those are positions you just can’t compete against. With the traditional remote-control cameras, if the subject showed untethered joy five feet out of frame, you were out of luck. Now if Reuters is able to get that shot, “well, there’s nothing I can do,” he said. “Maybe I’ll have to upgrade my gear and make a robotic system. It’d be expensive, it might be a cost I have to take on.”

Robo-Cams at the Olympic Games Make Human Photogs Sweat [Wired]

Amazing Slow Motion Footage Using a High Speed Camera Robot

Super slow motion footage captured by high speed cameras usually shows slow movements (if any), but German studio The Marmalade came up with a brilliant way of speeding up the movements: a high-speed robot camera operator.

Our groundbreaking High Speed Motion Control System ‘Spike’ brings the creative freedom of a moving camera to the world of high speed filming and so enables us to create shots that would be impossible to achieve otherwise. ‘Spike’ can freely move the camera with unparalleled speed and precision, thereby removing the previously existing creative limitation of having to shoot high speed sequences with a locked camera.

By marrying the hardware of a sturdy and reliable industrial robot to software that was built from the ground up for the demands of motion controlled high speed imaging, we developed a unique system for creating real life camera moves with the ease of use normally associated with 3D Animation.

The system does camera moves that are exactly repeatable, allowing them to be slightly tweaked until the shot is just right.
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