Posts Tagged ‘robertcapa’

The Mexican Suitcase: One of 20th Century Photography’s Biggest Mysteries

One of the most interesting photographic mysteries of the 20th century is the story of the ‘Mexican Suitcase’ — something that is neither a suitcase, nor Mexican. What it is, is three boxes of roughly 4,500 negatives that depicted the Spanish Civil War, and were lost for more than 50 years.

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The Story Behind Robert Capa’s Pictures of the D-Day Invasion that Almost Never Were

TIME’s Behind the Picture recently dove into the fascinating story behind how some of the most iconic photographs of World War II almost never were. Narrated by John Morris, Editor of LIFE magazine during WWII, Morris tells the story behind the photographs captured by Robert Capa on Omaha Beach during the D-Day invasion. Read more…

Incredibly Rare Robert Capa Interview Lets Us Hear His Voice for the Very First Time

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Two days ago, the late great Robert Capa would have turned 100 years old. There was quite a bit of revelry surrounding what would have been the iconic photographer’s centennial, but even though gallery openings and the like all paid homage to the great conflict photographer, one particular release is perhaps most special of all.

Thanks to an incredibly fortuitous set of circumstances, the International Center of Photography has managed to get its hands on and release a copy of an incredibly rare interview Mr. Capa gave back in October of 1947 — affording anyone who didn’t know him the first ever opportunity to hear his voice. Read more…

Adobe Image Deblurring Done on Capa’s Famous D-Day Photo

Update: We’ve removed this image to avoid fringing on the copyright held by Magnum Photos. Click the image below to see the original side-by-side comparison.


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Still think Adobe’s Image Deblurring technology is fake? Check out this before-and-after comparison showing what the feature does to one of the most famous camera-shake photos in history: Robert Capa’s D-Day photograph of an American soldier landing on Omaha Beach.
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Three and a Half Rolls of Melted History

On June 6, 1944 — also known as D-Day — war photographer Robert Capa braved the defenses of the heavily fortified Omaha beach, swimming ashore with the second wave of soldiers. Using two Contax II cameras, a 50mm lens, and several rolls of film, he managed to capture 106 photographs documenting the first couple hours of the now-famous invasion (Omaha beach is the one seen in the opening scenes of Saving Private Ryan). After he raced back to London to have the film processed, a Life magazine darkroom technician make a tragic mistake: the dryer was set too high and the emulsion on three and a half of the rolls melted, completely erasing 95 of the 106 photos. The 11 remaining images were all published and became Capa’s most famous work.

If you ever accidentally nuke some photos, whether film or digital, just remember Capa’s three and a half rolls of melted history and you might not feel so bad about your lost images.

The Magnificent Eleven: The D-Day Photographs of Robert Capa [Skylighters]