Posts Tagged ‘restore’

BTS: See How Andy Warhol’s Amiga Photo Illustrations Were Recovered

Late last month, we shared with you a story about a team of computer scientists, archivists, artists and curators who recovered photo-manipulation work by famed artist Andy Warhol that had been trapped on 41 ‘lost’ floppy disks from the introduction of the Amiga computer system.

Today, we dive further behind the scenes with a fascinating followup video, provided by the Hillman Photography Initiative of the Carnegie Museum of Art, that takes a look at the incredible amount of work and dedication that went into actually recovering these files. Read more…

Redditors Pitch In to Help Restore an 87-Year-Old Grandfather’s WWII Photo

wwIIphoto

Redditor Steven Withey‘s grandfather Derek is an 87-year-old WWII veteran who served in the Royal Navy, and a little while back he showed his grandson a badly damaged Navy photo (of a photo) of himself as a 20-year-old.

He had showed him the photo in the hopes that his technologically savvy grandson could maybe touch it up a bit, but given the massive creases and tears he didn’t have much hope. It turns out he needn’t have worried, because in this particular case, Reddit came to the rescue. Read more…

Time-Lapse Videos of Old B&W Photos Being Infused with Color

Earlier this year, we shared some amazing work by Swedish retoucher Sanna Dullaway, who takes historical B&W photographs and colorizes them. YouTube user IColoredItForYou is another master of restoring, retouching, and colorizing, but what’s awesome about his work is that he creates behind-the-scenes videos showing how the edits are done. The above time-lapse video shows how he recently used Photoshop to colorize Margaret Bourke-White’s famous 1937 photograph, titled “Bread Line during the Louisville flood, Kentucky”.
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A Look at the Beauty Inside of a Classic Rangefinder

Beauty may be only skin deep for us humans, but crack open a classic rangefinder and there something both nostalgic and beautiful about the components therein. The people behind Ilott Vintage — a Miami-based camera restoration project — know this, and so when they’re restoring an old Minolta Hi-Matic 7 or Olympus 35RD, they sometimes take the time to make a little video showing off the craftsmanship and components we don’t always get to see.

Getting your hands on one of these restored masterpieces will cost you a pretty penny (think a couple thousand), but the classic camera you get will be more than just a collectors item, it’ll actually work. Head over to their website for more info on the company and a look at their selection, or check out their Vimeo page for more classic camera eye candy.

(via Gizmodo)

Restoring a Tintype Photo from the 1870s

Photo restorer Bob Rosinsky of Top Dog Imaging wrote an interesting article describing how he restored a tintype photograph from the 1870s brought to him by a client.

My standard operating procedure is to use an ultra-high resolution camera combined with a top-of-the-line macro lens to photograph tintypes. I use strobe lights to illuminate the artwork. Strobes produce “hard” light, much like the sun on a clear day. In addition to the strobes, I place a polarizer over the camera lens and polarizer gels over the strobe lights. This eliminates all reflections and enables the camera to pick up a greater tonal range along with more detail.

[...] I began the laborious process of restoration, which involved a prodigious amount of retouching.

Reminds us a bit of this 76-year-old Chinese Photoshop master’s work.

Restoring a Photograph from the 1870s (via kottke.org)


P.S. Earlier this week another tintype photo from the same decade sold for $2.3 million.

76-year-old Photoshop Master in China Restores Old Photos for Free

Having old photographs restored is a service that many residents in China can’t afford, but a 76-year-old man named Baojun Yuan is doing his part to help his fellow citizens by offering his astonishing Photoshop talents free of charge. After learning how to use the program when he was 60 years old, Yuan purchased a computer and scanner, and has fixed more than 2,000 photographs. He says, “my teacher just taught me how to repair the photos, but he forgot to tell me how to charge.”
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MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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How to Fix Simple Cosmetic Issues on Old Lenses

I really love using old lenses on modern digital cameras, but many old lenses have cosmetic issues that make them a little less pleasant to use. Here are a few very cheap and easy things you can do to make these old lenses a little nicer to look at and to use. I don’t advocate doing this to rare collectible lenses; this is for “user” lenses.

Note that these things have nothing to do with internal functionality of the focus or aperture, nor the condition of the glass. That should all be good before even thinking about this. No sense making lens ergonomics better if the lens isn’t known to be worth using!
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How to Recover Deleted Photos from a Memory Card with PhotoRec

Last night my pastor emailed me telling me that he had accidentally deleted an entire folder of photographs off his Sony compact camera, and that Sony’s technical support informed him that it would cost $200-300 for them to recover the photos. After I got a hold of the memory card, I checked some of the recovery programs I’ve used in the past, but discovered that they now require paid licenses to actual do recovery (though analysis is free). I then stumbled across PhotoRec, a free and open source command-line application that’s bundled with TestDisk, something I’ve successfully used to regain access to inaccessible external hard drives.

In this post I’m going to show you how you can use PhotoRec to recover your photos if you’ve accidentally deleted them or formatted your memory card.
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