Posts Tagged ‘resize’

Quick Tip: A Great Way to Resize Low-Res Images in Photoshop

The most recent video to come out of Adobe’s “Photoshop Playbook” series of tutorials offers a quick and useful tip for if you ever find yourself having to resize a low res image. It’s meant for relative newbies to Photoshop, so it’s not anything groundbreaking by any means, but if you use Photoshop CC it could come in very handy (and yes, this particular method is limited to Photoshop CC).

So check it out and let us know what you think. And if you like these basic tutorials, be sure to watch the Photoshop 101 video we shared a while back, and then lean more about Adobe’s Photoshop Playbook Tutorial Series by clicking here.

Create a Smaller, Emailable Copy of Your RAW Photo Using Lightroom’s Export

honeyishrunk

Need to send someone some RAW photographs but hate the fact that they weigh tens of megabytes each? You can actually resize the files to smaller sizes quite easily in Lightroom, making sending small copies back and forth a snap.
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How to Quickly Resize Multiple Photos in Mac OS X Using a Terminal Command

If you use a Mac and regularly need to resize batches of photos, there’s actually a tool built into your operating system that lets you do just that without having to open any image editing program. It’s called “sips”, which stands for scriptable image processing system. It’s extremely easy to use, but you’ll need to know how to use Terminal to take advantage of it.
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Explanation of Content Aware Resizing

You might have seen examples of Photoshop’s Content Aware Scaling feature in action, but do you know what goes on behind the scenes that allows it to magically work? This presentation from the SIGGRAPH 2007 conference sheds some light on the technical mojo that allows you to manipulate the size and shape of photos in crazy ways.

The same concept is found in the Liquid Scale app we featured a while back.

Batch Conversion with Photo Magician

Photo Magician is a free and lightweight (less than 1MB) program for Windows that allows you to batch convert a directory of photographs. It’s similar in functionality to Photoshop’s “Image Processor” feature, with one difference being you can’t select the output quality like you can using Photoshop.

The program also features a “Quick Convert Mode”, which minimizes the program to a little box onto which you can drag and drop folders of images. If you’ve been looking for a quick way to resize images in Vista (like the Image Resize PowerToy allowed you to do in XP), then you might want to check out this program.

Download Photo Magician 1.0.0.3 (via Lifehacker)


P.S. For a more powerful free program that’s even more similar to Photoshop’s Image Processor, you can check out BIMP Lite.

A Shortener for… Your Photographs?

Liquid Scale is an app for the iPhone and iPod Touch that offers content aware image resizing. What does that mean? Basically it’s like a URL shortener for your photographs, reducing the dimensions of the photograph but retaining the meaning.

Liquid Scale enables new creative ways of editing images. It resizes pictures without deforming or cropping the content. Pictures can be transformed to a new aspect ratio in a fast and intuitive way.

Basically the application detects which areas of the photograph are “unimportant” (either automatically or manually), and attempts to only reduce and remove these areas through the resizing. Here’s an interesting video showing how it works:

We’re not sure how useful this app is, but the technology is pretty interesting nonetheless. The application is available at the iPhone App Store for $1.99.

Why You Should Never Let Browsers Resize Your Photos

Everyone wants sharp images when they post their photographs online. After all, who wants to look at a blurry photograph? (Unless it’s intentional, of course). What many people don’t realize, however, is that displaying your images incorrectly in HTML can have a big negative impact on image quality.

Here is the main rule of thumb you should always remember: never, ever do image resizing using HTML.

For example, lets say I have the following 620px photograph:

threecolors620

The image is pretty sharp right? Now, lets say I want to display the same image as a 500px wide photo. The wrong way to do this would be to change the width=”620″ attribute in HTML to width=”500″. Here’s what would result if I did the resizing this way through HTML:

threecolors620

That’s the exact same image file. I simply copy-and-pasted the HTML, and changed the width from 620 to 500. This means the browser actually loaded the same 620px image, and then reprocessed it to display a 500px image to the viewer. Notice how the photograph instantly loses much of the sharpness it had when displayed in its actual dimensions.

To further illustrate my point, here is the same photo displayed at 500px. However, instead of telling HTML to shrink the large version, I used Photoshop to resize it down to 500px.

threecolors2

You can hover your mouse over this last image to compare it to the browser-resized version. If you’re using a browser that renders it correctly, try hovering over this link to see how other less-capable browsers render the same image (you might have to wait a couple seconds for the image to load). That’s a pretty big difference, huh?

The lesson to be learned is that you should always display your images in their exact dimensions. Even a single pixel difference can cause the photograph to become noticeably more blurry in most browsers.

Finally, another reason why you shouldn’t leave resizing to your browser is that the original, full-sized image is loaded anyway, regardless of what size you’re displaying the image at. This means that if you have a large, 1 megabyte, 1024×682 photograph that you’re displaying at 500px in width, the whole 1 megabyte image is downloaded by the visitor before the browser resizes it down to 500px.

Some of you might have thought that using larger, higher-resolution photographs and having them resized in HTML produces higher quality images, since there’s more information or detail in the file. It doesn’t. For best image quality and fastest loading time for your visitors, always resize your images to the desired size prior to uploading!

Update: I’ve added a second link under the mouse-hover comparison for those who are using more capable browsers. If you don’t see any difference in hovering over the image, try hovering over the new link to see how other browsers render the image.

Update 2: Just for your info: This doesn’t apply to uploading full-sized images to photo sharing services like Flickr or SmugMug. These services take your large resolution photograph, and reprocess it into multiple images of various sizes. Thus, when you’re viewing the 500px image on Flickr, it’s actually a 500px image that Flickr resized and sharpened using your original large image.