Posts Tagged ‘researchers’

Researchers Use a 480-Camera Dome to More Accurately Capture 3D Motion

Traditional 3D motion capture technologies, amazing though they are, are limited. They only give you a small number of data points to work with, and while they seem to capture a great deal of detail, their abilities are far outpaced by the intricate movements of the human body.

Fortunately, there’s a new technology in development that might just be able to solve this problem by throwing a crap-load of cameras at it. Read more…

MIT Project Mimics Iconic Portrait Photogs, Takes Your Selfies to the Next Level

Are you not impressed with your average Instagram selfie? Is the lighting too bland and out of place for your liking? If so, a team made up of a researcher from MIT and a few individuals from Adobe and the University of Virginia might just have a solution to your problem.

They’ve created an algorithm capable of accurately stylizing an average, otherwise insignificant selfie to look like the works of some of the best-known and well-respected portrait photographers of all time. Read more…

Researchers Create Tiny, Inexpensive, High Quality Lenses by Baking Drops of Silicon

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Get out your Easy Bake Ovens and your polydimethylsiloxane, it’s time to make some lenses. Okay, okay… so it’s not that easy. But researchers at an Australian University have developed a new way to make extremely inexpensive, high-quality lenses by using nothing more than droplets of a transparent silicon and an oven to cure said droplets in. Read more…

Researchers Find a Way to Show 80 Years of Aging by Morphing a Single Photo

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In crazy-bordering-on-creepy-but-also-super-fascinating news, researchers at the University of Washington have found a new technique to simulate the aging process of human faces over the course of almost eight decades … using nothing more than a single photo. Read more…

Smartphone App Snaps Stealthy Photos to Spy On Your Life in 3D

With the advent of Internet-connectivity and apps in cameraphones and digital cameras, images can now be shared with others in ways never before seen in the history of photography. Unfortunately, not all of the ways are positive. Some are downright creepy.

Take PlaceRaider, for example. It’s a malicious Android app that hijacks your smartphone’s camera, secretly takes photos of your life, and uses those images to reconstruct 3D virtual spaces of private locations.
Read more…

50-Gigapixel Camera Created Using 98 Microcameras

Scientists at Duke University have created a digital camera that boasts a whopping 50 gigapixels. The camera, dubbed AWARE-2, uses 98 separate 14-megapixel microcameras and a special spherical lens. Each microcamera captures a tiny portion of the scene and a specially designed processor stitches the images together. Processing the data is so hardware intensive that 97% of the camera is made up of electronics and computer components (the other 3% is the optical elements).
Read more…

Prototype Camera Projects a White Frame Line Onto the Real World

Researchers at Osaka University in Japan have created a new camera that makes shooting “from the hip” easier by projecting a white border onto the real world — similar to what laser sights do for firearms. The frame line shows exactly the area that will be in the photograph, and allows users to quickly shoot without looking through or at the camera itself. Before you get too excited about the possibility of using it for street photography, here’s the bad news: it’s more suited for things like snapping QR codes due to the fact that the compact projector is only bright enough to be used in dark places and at close range.

(via DigInfo via Gizmodo)

Prototype Camera Lets You Shoot Photos by Framing Scenes with Your Fingers

Last November we featured a concept camera called Air that is worn on your fingers and snaps photographs when you frame scenes with your fingers. That concept may soon become a reality. Researchers at IAMAS in Japan have developed a tiny camera called Ubi-Camera that captures photos as you position your fingers in the shape of a frame. The shutter button is triggered with your opposite hand’s thumb, and the “zoom” level is determined by how far the camera is from the photographer’s face. Expect these cameras to land on store shelves at about the same time as the gesture-controlled computers from Minority Report.

(via DigInfo TV via Geeky Gadgets)

Composite Image of Titanic on the Ocean Floor Created From 100,000 Photos

Researchers have created the first comprehensive image of the entire 3×5-mile debris field around the sinking of the Titanic:

Compiled from more than 100,000 photos taken by underwater robots, the composite image shows the world’s best remembered shipwreck in strikingly sharp detail. Although much of the debris is hidden, you can see how the ship split apart and tell by the debris that they hit the ground violently. In just over a month — April 15 — it will have been a century since the ship hit an iceberg and sunk to the bottom of the Atlantic.

(via The Atlantic via Photographs on the Brain)


Image credit: Photograph by RMS Titantic Inc.

Researchers Turn an Ordinary Canon 5D Into a Hyperspectral Camera

Hyperspectral cameras are capable of collecting and processing information across the electromagnetic spectrum and beyond what the human eye can see. The technology ordinarily costs a fortune to get a hold of, but scientists at the Vienna University of Technology have figured out how to create a hyperspectral camera using an ordinary DSLR (the Canon 5D) and an adapter made of off-the-shelf parts (PVC pipes, a gel filter, and three camera lenses). The camera still has a ways to go in many areas — it requires several seconds to exposes images rather than milliseconds — but it’s a big step towards showing what’s possible with consumer camera technology.

(via Vienna University of Technology via The Verge)