Posts Tagged ‘research’

Great Scott! Corneal Imaging is Actually a Real Thing!

Earlier today, we poked fun at a clip from the TV show CSI showing some pseudo-scientific photo enhancing. Many of the comments on YouTube also poked fun at the mention of “corneal imaging”, in which the investigators used to obtain imagery from the reflections seen in an eyeball. Turns out corneal imaging is a real thing…
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Magical App Uses Your Phone’s Camera to Accurately Measure Your Pulse

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” That’s the quote by science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke that you’ll find on Cardiio‘s homepage. It’s a quote that is quite appropriate, given what the app can do.

The app is a touch-free heart rate monitor that can accurately tell you your pulse by simply looking at your face through your phone’s camera.
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Color Photo Printed at 100,000 DPI, the Highest Resolution Ever Achieved

Stuff a few thousand dots per inch into a color print, and you have yourself a pretty high resolution image that most people would approve of. What if you could stuff 100,000 dots into that same inch?

That’s what researchers were able to do recently in creating the highest-resolution photograph ever printed — and one of the smallest, to boot.
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Location Recognition for Photographs by Looking at Architecture

Cameras these days are smart enough to recognize the faces found inside photographs and label them with names. What if the same kind of recognition could be done for the locations of photographs? What if, instead of using satellite geodata, the camera could simply recognize where it is by the contents of the photographs?

That’s what research being done at Carnegie Mellon University and INRIA/Ecole Normale SupĂ©rieure in Paris may one day lead to. A group of researchers have created a computer program that can identify the distinctive architectural elements of major cities by processing street-level photos.
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Super-Resolution From a Single Image

Super-Resolution From a Single Image” is an interesting research page by computer scientists over at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. It details the group’s efforts to create sharp enlargements of small photographs, and offers comparisons between their algorithm and other popular ones being used and researched (e.g. nearest neighbor, bi-cubic). The large image of the baby seen above was created from the tiny image on the left. See if you can create something more useable using Photoshop.

Super-Resolution From a Single Image (via MetaFilter)

“More Americans Becoming Serious Photographers”

An interesting headline spotted over at Yahoo News: “More Americans Becoming Serious Photographers“. In the article, analyst Chris Chute of research firm IDC says that more people in the US are identifying themselves as “enthusiasts”:

Chute said that about half of SLR owners consider themselves to be enthusiasts “who really enjoy photography and know how to use manual settings on a camera.” According to his research, only about a fifth of SLR owners consider themselves to be novices, “who just want to take pictures,” as he described it. Chute finds that surprising, since typically about half the owners of a technology would be in the novice group.

“There is a shift overall in the industry from casual to enthusiast,” said Hilton. She also found a big jump in people going from enthusiasts to semi-professionals who earn money as part-time photographers.

Chute also finds that more and more people are starting to buy a “once-obscure” type of lens: the “prime”.

More Americans Becoming Serious Photographers [Yahoo News]


Image credit: DSLR-Boy by code_martial

Japanese Researchers Reconstruct 3D Spaces from Regular Photos Instantly

There’s nothing new about creating 3D spacial diagrams using 2D photos, but what a group of Japanese researchers is currently working on may speed up and streamline the process so much so that anybody can use it. Their system uses no special camera equipment, all you need is a point-and-shoot and a wireless SD card so that you can upload form anywhere.

If you have those two things, the software that the researchers from the Tokyo Institute of Technology are developing can take the pics you send its way and quickly create a spacial 3D reconstruction based on those photos. This way you could access and see the results, even from a distance, right away. Read more…

Camera Obscura Images Can be Collected From Any Windowed Room

The camera obscura has been around for a long time (Middle Ages long) and typically consisted of a box or room with a hole in one side through which an image of its surroundings could be formed. As you can see from the example above, any room — in this case a bathroom — can be turned into a camera obscura given a small enough “aperture.” Unfortunately, most rooms have big, blaring windows that let in too much light, and the only image formed on the opposite wall is a shadowy blob.

In the name of forensics, however, Antonio Torralba and William Freeman from MIT have discovered a technique by which they can turn any windowed room into a camera obscura, using a couple of stills of the room to magically gather an image of the outside world. Read more…

Magnifying the Subtle Changes in Video to Reveal the Invisible

Here’s a video overview of some interesting research that’s being done in the area of video processing. By taking standard video as an input and doing some fancy technical mojo on it, researchers are able to amplify information in it to reveal things that are virtually invisible to the human eye. For example, you can detect a baby’s heartbeat by simply pointing a camera at his/her face. The method is able to visualize the pulsating flow of blood that fills the face.

(via MIT via John Nack)

The Frozen Face Effect: Why You Look Worse in Photos than in Video

If you’ve always felt that you look more attractive in videos than you do in photographs, you’re not alone. A recent study done by researchers at UC Davis and Harvard has found that subjects generally find video footage of people more attractive than stills showing the same face. It turns out that looking attractive in photos is no easy feat due to what the researchers are calling the “frozen face effect.”
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