Posts Tagged ‘research’

Researchers Develop a Method for Taking 3D Photos with a Single Static Lens

harvard3d_1

For a while now, researchers have been trying to remove two things from 3D photos and video: the glasses and the second lens. Some companies have made headway in the area — think of Samsung’s single-lens 3D technology and Panasonic’s special single-lens 3D sensor — but some new research out of Harvard offers a software-based alternative. Read more…

Hack Transforms Common Microscopes Into Gigapixel Superscopes

NPhoton_final_media

Researchers at the California Institute of Technology have come up with an inexpensive way to boost the resolution of common microscopes by a factor of 100, allowing medical clinics in developing countries to conduct complex tests with existing equipment.
Read more…

Researchers Reconstruct Highly-Accurate 3D Scenes Using High-Res Photos

3D modeling for movies and video games is often done using lasers. The modeler scans whatever it is they are trying to reconstruct using a laser and then ends up spending a good bit of time cleaning up the results in post. In contrast, a new method developed by the folks at Disney Zurich promises to generate much more accurate results by replacing the lasers with photos. Read more…

Camera Used For Stargazing Helps Detect Common Form of Sight Loss

Cardiff Camera

Here’s yet another example of how technology used in space can help us earthlings in other ways. A partnership between scientists at Cardiff University and the UK Astronomy Technology Center has yielded a prototype device that can help detect Age-Related Macular Degeneration (otherwise known as AMD) — a common form of sight loss — using camera technology designed originally for use on space telescopes.
Read more…

Research Shows that Online Camera Gear Reviews May Be Distorted by Fanboys

camerafanboys

Can you trust camera reviews submitted by customers of online retailers? Not entirely, suggests a new academic study, and not for the reasons you might think.
Read more…

Slow Motion X-Ray Cameras Offer Insight Into How Bats Fly

Wildlife researchers now have a much clearer idea of how bats fly, thanks to the wicked-looking X-Ray video above that shows the animal’s skeleton at work.
Read more…

CrowdCam: A Photo App That Lets You See a Scene from Multiple Angles

First Lytro tried to make focusing irrelevant, and now an MIT project wants to make choosing a camera angle a thing of the past.

Aydin Arpa, a reserarcher at MIT’s Media Lab, recently presented a paper on CrowdCam, an app in development that would combine images taken from multiple perspectives into a seamless visual field where you could change the perspective just by swiping your finger on the screen.
Read more…

Researchers Take Aim at Automatically Detecting Photo Fakes on Twitter

fakesandy

You might remember the photo above from last year. For a while, it circulated the web like mad, claiming to show Hurricane Sandy bearing down menacingly on the Statue of Liberty. But if you’ve read our previous coverage on the photo, you’ll know that it is, in fact, a fake — a composite of a Statue of Liberty picture and a well-known photo by weather photographer Mike Hollingshead.

Photo fakes like this wind up going viral online all the time, often helped along by Twitter where retweet upon retweet puts it in front of thousands of unsuspecting people. Having had enough, a group of researchers from the University of Maryland, IBM Research Labs and the Indraprastha Institute of Information Technology are trying to do something about it. Read more…

What is it About Photographs That Makes People Click?

pinterestpopular

Why is it that some photographs go viral online while others are left by the digital wayside? Are there certain elements in photos that make them more “sharable” to Internet users?

Curalate, a company that creates social media analytics software, decided to tackle this question by analyzing the photographs published by brands to Pinterest.
Read more…

Researchers Tweak Camera Sensors to Boost Smartphone Battery Life

Camera Sensor Flickr

There’s no doubt about the fact that using the camera on your shiny smartphone is killing your battery life. But up until now, it seems like the only proposed solutions have been to work on the battery itself instead of looking at the camera.

Researchers at both Microsoft and Rice University think they’ve come up with a solution that will make your gadget’s camera far more energy efficient by focusing on the camera’s sensor and the power it uses.
Read more…