Posts Tagged ‘research’

A Look Into Google’s Impressive HDR+ Feature for Its Latest Nexus Phone Cameras

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Google’s Nexus 5 and 6 smartphones have a new Camera app feature called HDR+. This mode uses fancy computational photography tricks to help you capture better photos in situations with uneven lighting or low amounts of light.

In a post published to the Google Research blog this past week, researchers behind the new feature offer a peek at the inner workings.
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The Macropod is a $20,000+ Rig That Makes Macro Photography Stupidly Easy to Do

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Macro photography is a wonderful tool for scientists and researchers, but the complex nature of capturing detailed, focus-stacked macro images of everything from insects to the human tongue puts the tool out of reach of many.

The Macropod photographic system solves this by making the entire process both portable and automatic, and producing some of the sharpest, most striking macro photographs we’ve ever seen. Read more…

Help Scientists Track Cosmic Ray Particles Using Your Smartphone Camera

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Scientists at the University of California are looking to crowdsource their efforts to measure and track the unimaginable number of cosmic ray particles that bombard the Earth every second of the day. And all you need to participate is a smartphone with a camera and the researchers’ app. Read more…

Your Future Smartphone Camera May Be Able to See Cancer Thanks to the Mantis Shrimp

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Mimicking animal and bug vision to create unique and interesting cameras is nothing new. Bug vision cameras with, for example, infinite depth of field, have been made in the lab before. But researchers at University of Queensland in Australia are developing a camera that can do something pretty unique: it can see cancer.

The idea came after the scientists discovered that mantis shrimp have this incredibly useful ability. Read more…

Researchers Create Software Capable of Intelligently Averaging Thousands of Photos Into One

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Researchers at UC Berkeley have created software that automatically averages hundreds or thousands of similar images to create the pinnacle of amalgamations.

Unveiled last month, AverageExplorer lets users see the average image that represents whatever collection of images they’re looking at. The idea is to break down the overwhelming amount of images given when searching through Google Images, Flickr or Bing and combining it into one visual summary of the result.
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Your Future Camera Might Be Powered by Hemp

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In an interesting development in the world of batteries, researchers have discovered and demonstrated a way to make extremely efficient carbon electrodes by heating up the fibers of hemp in a two-step method.

The resulting carbon electrodes hold as much energy as the super-material graphene, are more durable in extreme temperatures, and come at a much lower cost — pretty much the ideal material to make batteries out of. Read more…

Did You Know: Studies Show People Believe They Look Like the Retouched Version of Themselves

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Remember the “Dove Real Beauty Sketches” advertisement? It was the ad that brought in various women, and then had those women and a stranger they had just met describe them to a forensic artists. This, in the end, showed the original participants that they were far more beautiful than they saw themselves.

It was an admirable advertisement that went viral, but according to a series of studies performed last year by psychological researchers Nicholas Epley of the University of Chicago and Erin Whitchurch of the University of Virginia, the Dove campaign might just have it backwards. In other words: they found that we actually think we’re MORE attractive than we really are. Read more…

Game Changing Algorithm Turns First Person Videos Into Incredibly Smooth Hyperlapses

Researchers at Microsoft just changed the POV video game — there’s no doubt about that. Using a newly developed algorithm, they transform long, boring first person videos shot with helmet cams into super smooth hyperlapses that look like they were shot with a steadicam. Read more…

MIT Researchers Develop a Drone that Can Automatically Light Your Subjects for You

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A group of researchers from MIT want your next lighting rig to be autonomous and airborne. Set to be on display this August at the Symposium on Computational Aesthetics in Graphics, Visualization and Imaging, they’ve actually developed a drone that automatically and dynamically lights a subject (living or otherwise) for a photographer while he or she focuses on getting the shot. Read more…

New Chemical Iris Technology May Change the Way Smartphone Apertures Work

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As smartphones have gotten smaller and smaller, the need for the cameras inside of them to shrink has become more pressing. One area where there’s a lot of room for improvement is in the traditional mechanical aperture.

As we begin to hit the physical limit of the overlapping blades, researchers at the University of Kaiserslautern have designed an exciting new ‘micro iris’ that uses small chemical rings rather than a physical blades, dramatically shrinking the size of the aperture components in the camera. Read more…