Posts Tagged ‘research’

Researchers Find a Way to Show 80 Years of Aging by Morphing a Single Photo

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In crazy-bordering-on-creepy-but-also-super-fascinating news, researchers at the University of Washington have found a new technique to simulate the aging process of human faces over the course of almost eight decades … using nothing more than a single photo. Read more…

IMGembed White Paper Claims that 85% of Images Shared Online Go Unsourced

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IMGembed, a start-up we initially mentioned just over a year ago, has just released a report they conducted that predicts that around 85% of the images shared online go entirely uncredited. Read more…

Innovate or Die: What Camera Companies Could Learn from a Vacuum Manufacturer

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In a short appearance earlier today in Japan, inventor and Dyson founder Sir James Dyson dropped a line that is worthy of its own headline and should be forwarded to every head honcho at every camera company in the world. According to Engadget, he said, “A company that doesn’t double its R&D team every two years, I think, is in trouble.” Read more…

Portrait Analysis Reveals That The Human Face Can Express At Least 21 Emotions

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How many human emotions can you capture on camera? According to a study by researchers at Ohio State University, the number is at least 21.
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GPixel Announces Huge 150MP Full-Frame Sensor for Medical and Scientific Use

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The technology that makes its way into the cameras and imaging tools used for scientific and research applications tends to be vastly different than what we have in our more consumer-oriented cameras. Proving just how different is GPixel’s new GMAX3005 sensor — a 150MP full-frame monochrome behemoth. Read more…

TIME Magazine Ranks the Top 100 ‘Selfiest’ Cities in the World

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Selfies… for better or worse, they’ve become a staple of the society we live in. But where exactly lies the epicenter of this movement so many of us love to hate (or just maybe hate to love)? Read more…

Cambridge Looks to Save ‘Lost’ Negatives from Antarctic Expedition

Led by Captain Robert Scott, a team of scientists and their journey photographer, Herbert Ponting, made a polar expedition to Antarctica in 1911. Currently, The Scott Polar Research Institute in Cambridge (a sub-division of Cambridge) holds all of Ponting’s resulting negatives from this journey, as well as a collection of photographic work from the other scientists along for the exploration.

There is still, however, a piece (or pieces, rather) of the collection missing. That piece includes 113 ‘lost’ images taken by expedition leader Captain Scott, with a little bit of camera help from Ponting. Read more…

Visualizing the Trends and Patterns of the World Through Instagram

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Living smack in the middle of the information age, we’re well acquainted with the incredible amount of data and statistics gathered and thrown around on a daily basis. And with the advent of social networking, the amount of publicly available data about society has only increased.

These networks are a treasure trove of information for better understanding the underlying trends and habits of people. Trends that would otherwise go unseen. One research project in particular, called Phototrails, is trying to spot these trends by gathering insights from that photography-oriented social media site many of us love to hate: Instagram. Read more…

New ‘Nano-Camera’ from MIT Sees Things at the Speed of Light, Costs Only $500

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A super-fast, affordable new camera currently under development at MIT could improve everything from video game experiences to driving safety, researchers reported at a recent tech convention. Read more…

China is Investing in Photoshop Research After Too Many Embarrassing Experiences

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After experiencing one too many embarrassing, high-profile Photoshop disasters, China is turning its research focus on image-editing software, although not in the way you might think. Read more…