Posts Tagged ‘remote’

Affordable Bluetooth Trigger Turns Your iPhone Into a Remote and Intervalometer

bttrigger2

Here’s another option for DSLR-toting photogs who want to control their gear wirelessly from a distance without spending a fortune. It doesn’t have the range of the CamRanger or the ability to send over a live view like, say, the built-in wireless on the Canon 6D; however, it’s less than one sixth the price of the first, and you won’t have to upgrade your camera to get it.

It’s the Satechi Bluetooth Smart Trigger, and it comes in three versions that are compatible with a range of Canon and Nikon DSLRs (plus a couple of Pentax options) for only $45.

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K-Circle: A Heavy-Duty DSLR Controller That Iron Man Would Be Proud Of

ironmankcircle

We’ve seen quite a few wired and wireless DSLR controller options in our day — ranging from the creative DIY variety to the cool but expensive type — but we’ve never seen one that looks quite like this. The newly announced K-Circle from LockCircle looks like something Iron Man would use if he were into photography — assuming he shot Canon, that is.
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Trigger Your Camera 12 Different Ways With Triggertrap’s New App

When we told you about the StrikeFinder app earlier, we mentioned that what set it apart was that it used your actual iPhone’s camera; it wasn’t just acting as the trigger. Well, Trigertrap’s new mobile app is just acting as the trigger, but it’s acting as a very comprehensive trigger. Read more…

Nikon Camera Control: An Open Source App for Remote DSLR Control

Nikon shooters: Nikon Camera Control is a new open source Windows application that lets you remotely control your Nikon DSLR using a PC and a USB cable. Features include tethering, remote control over camera’s basic settings, remote shutter triggering, an intervalometer for time-lapses, and fullscreen review.

Nikon Camera Control (via Nikon Rumors)

Trigger Happy Turns Your Smartphone Into a Fancy Camera Remote

Trigger Happy is a new product that lets you use your iOS or Android smartphone as a fancy camera remote. It consists of an app and a one-meter-long cable that goes from your phone’s audio jack to your camera. Besides acting as a simple remote shutter release for shake-free shots, the app offers bulb functionality for timing long exposures, an intervalometer for timelapse photography, HDR mode, and bramping. They’re also working on lightning detection, audio waveform detection, face detection, and accelerometer-based triggering.
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Amazon Selling a Wireless Remote for Nikon DSLRs for Just $2

Amazon is selling the Photive ML-L3 Wireless Shutter Release Remote for Nikon DSLRs for just $2 with free shipping. The retail price is $30, so it’s a crazy 93% discount. No idea if the price will last — maybe it’s a mistake.

Photive ML-L3 Wireless Shutter Release Remote (via The Digital Picture)


Update: Looks like the remote only ships to US addresses.


Update: Here’s something similar for Canon DSLRs for $2.88.

Control Your Canon DSLR with Your Android Phone Using DSLR Controller

If you’ve been dying to turn your Android phone into a remote for your Canon DSLR, today’s your lucky day. A developer who goes by “chainfire” has released a new app called “DSLR Controller“. It gives you live view and access to a whole host of camera functions through your phone, which connects to the camera through a USB host cable. Check out the demo above to see it in action. The beta version currently costs $8.56 over in the Android Market.

DSLR Controller (via Reddit)

Apple Patent Appears to Show System for Disabling Camera Remotely

Apple recently filed a patent having to do with baking infrared communication capabilities into the iPhone. Although there are certainly useful applications for the technology (e.g. a museum beaming information to the phone at different exhibitions), what’s troubling is that the feature may also allow the camera to be remotely disabled by those who wish to prevent photography.

[...] the transmitter could be located in an area where photography is prohibited and the infrared signal could include encoded data that represents a command to disable recording functions.

This example could easily apply to movie theatres trying to stop customers from filming a movie for illegal distribution or any kind of music concert to protect an artist’s image from being photographed or videoed illegally, as shown below. [#]

I don’t know about you, but I don’t want a camera that could be disabled remotely by a third party…

(via Patently Apple via Engadget)

BlueSLR Dongle Offers GPS and Remote iPhone Shooting in a Small Package

onOneSoftware’s DSLR Camera Remote is a convenient way to control your camera remotely with an iPhone or iPad, but a major downside is that the camera needs to be connected via wire to a computer running the software. BlueSLR is a dongle that connects to your DSLR and allows it to be controlled using an iPhone or iPad, allowing you to shoot remotely from up to 300 feet away. It also geotags your photos, writing its GPS location to the EXIF data of your images. Sadly, it’s only compatible with Nikon DSLRs for now, though they’re working on releasing a Canon version as well.

Be warned though — portability will come at a great price. While the basic version of DSLR Camera Remote is free (the pro version is $20), the BlueSLR dongle will set you back $149. Hmmm… If the geotagging isn’t what you’re after, maybe carrying around a laptop isn’t such a big deal after all.

BlueSLR Remote Shutter (via Engadget)

Atari Joystick Shutter Release for Canon

Self-described creative technologist Thiago Avancini hacked this Atari 2600 joystick into a shutter release cable — complete with an autofocus control for his Canon T2i. The controller is considerably larger than the average cable release or remote control, but it’s a pretty nifty. Avancini has more photos of the contraption on his site, but so far, no DIY instructions.

If you’re itching to save a buck and make like MacGyver, Instructables has a handy how-to for a Canon cable release — though it doesn’t look nearly as geek-chic as Avancini’s mod.

(via Gizmodo)