Posts Tagged ‘record’

Leica Announces Record Sales for 2011

After sticking too long to film technology, it looks like Leica is finally getting the digital game figured out. Yesterday it announced a record profit of €248.9 million for the latest fiscal year, a significant increase from the €158.2 million it earned the previous year.

The positive development is mainly due to the continuing strong demand for the Leica M system, the professional S system, the compact cameras and the Leica sport optics products.

They will also be paying dividends to shareholders — the first time the company has done so since 1997!

(via Foto Actualidad via Leica Rumors)


Image credit: Leica M9: Logo by bfishadow

1923 Leica Sells for $1.9 Million, Becomes World’s Most Expensive Camera

A Leica 0-series camera made in 1923 was sold this past weekend at WestLicht Photographica Auctions for a staggering €1.32 million (~$1.89 million). Only about 25 0-series cameras were manufactured to test the market before Leica began commercially producing the Leica A. It’s the most expensive camera ever sold, but is still only half the price of the most expensive photo that was auctioned earlier this month.
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Cindy Sherman Photograph Sells for $3.8 Million, Setting New Record

Cindy Sherman’s “Untitled #96″ from 1981 has become the world’s most valuable photograph after selling for a staggering $3.89 million at a Christie’s auction yesterday (it was estimated to be worth up to $2 million). The winning bidder was Philippe Segalot, a private advisor to some of the world’s wealthiest art collectors. The photo takes the top spot away from “99 Cent II Diptychon” by Andreas Gursky, which enjoyed five years as the world’s most valuable photo after selling for $3.35 million back in 2006.

(via ARTINFO via Popular Photography)


Image credit: Photograph by Cindy Sherman

Photographer Lights Photo with 300 Flashes and Sets World Record

What you see in this photograph is the most flashes ever used to light a single photograph. Photographer Jason Groupp synced and fired a whopping 300 flashes at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center this past weekend to set the record, which was confirmed and made official by Guinness World Records. Unlike other world records, this one doesn’t seem very difficult to break — all you need is some technical know-how, a lot of time, and extremely deep pockets.

Most Flashes Used to Make a Photograph (via PhotoComment)


Image credit: Photograph by Jason Groupp

Pinhole Camera Photo from on a Record

This photograph results from exposing a pinhole camera while it’s spinning around on a record player. A simple yet creative idea, huh?

(via Gizmodo)


Image credit: follow the tunes.. by Tim Franco and used with permission

Two Largest Photographs in the World

It’s quite a coincidence, but two of the largest images in the world were both announced recently. These images were created by taking thousands of individual high-resolution photographs and stitching them together to create gigantic panoramas.

Dresden – 26 gigapixels

The first, and the largest image in the world currently in terms of megapixels, is a panorama of Desden, Germany. It boasts a whopping 26 gigapixels:

desden

It was created using 1,665 individual 21.4 Megapixel photographs taken with a Canon 5D Mk II and a 400mm lens. A robot was used to shoot the photographs, and spent 172 minutes capturing the images. The 102 gigabytes of RAW data that resulted took 48GB of memory, 16 processors, and 94 hours to convert.

The photo was taken on the roof of the building “Haus der Presse” and starts at the left side with the Ostragehege. You can see the Congress Center and the Maritim Hotel rightwards. In the center is the city of Dresden with the famous Semperoper (back view), the castle and the Church of Our Lady. In the background is the television tower and you can identify outlines of the Saxon Switzerland. In the right part you can see the south of Dresden.

Prague – 18 gigapixels

This second image has less gigapixels than the previous one, but is a 360-degree panorama, meaning you can look in every direction:

prague

Hundreds of shots were taken over a few hours, and weeks were spent stitching the image. It was created by Jeffrey Martin the founder of 360cities.

Gigapixel Dresden (via PhotographyBLOG)
Prague TV Tower (via TechCrunch)