Posts Tagged ‘random’

Minecraft Founder ‘Notch’ is Likely the New Owner of That $1 Million Giant Leica Sculpture

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Here’s a super random piece of photographic trivia: that $1 million giant Leica sculpture in Los Angeles is likely now in the possession of Minecraft founder Markus Persson (AKA “Notch”).
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Asking Random People to Tell the Story Behind the Last Photo on Their Phone

San Francisco-based interactive artist and freelance creative Ivan Cash recently had a neat idea: go out on the streets of San Francisco and ask random people to share the story behind the most recent photo on their phone (note: there is one racy photo and a few curse words dropped by some of the interviewees). Read more…

PhotoYOLO: Receive One Photo Per Day from ‘a Friend You Just Haven’t Met Yet’

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Where popular culture is concerned, YOLO might be the new Carpe Diem. The acronym, which stands for “you only live once,” has become increasingly popular over the past several years after its first known mention in the NBC reality show The Average Joe back in 2004. Now, almost 10 years later, it’s broken into the photography industry with the new site PhotoYOLO. Read more…

A Shutter Sound Symphony Created with $30,000 in Nikon DSLR Gear

Photographer Benjamin Von Wong was taking a tour of Nikon Professional Services facilities recently when he had an idea: with so much Nikon gear around, why not try making music with the cameras? After all, it’s not often that you have tens of thousands of dollars in gear at your disposal to create something fun. The video above is what resulted.
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Rando: The Antisocial Photo-Sharing App

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Photo-sharing apps run the gamut between the hyper-social (ala Instagram: like, comment and share to your heart’s content) and the secretive (ala Snapchat: this photo will self-destruct in 3 … 2 … ). Ustwo’s new app Rando falls somewhere in that latter category, because while you can share photos with Rando, you have no idea who you’re sharing them with, or who is sharing them with you — and forget about likes, comments and favorites. Read more…

Big Bang: Abstract Photograms Created by Exposing Photo Paper to Fireworks

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What kind of imagery results when you mix photo paper and fireworks? That’s a question photographic artist Ross Sonnenberg has been exploring for the past few years. He creates one-of-a-kind camera-less photograms that look like abstract images of galaxies, but are actually random and colorful patterns created by the light of firecrackers.
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Exhibition Uses a Computer to Generate Every Possible Photograph

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If you think about it, any digital photograph is simply a finite collection of pixels, with each one showing a specific color. There are also only a finite number of colors each pixel on a display can be. Thus, there are only a finite number of photographs that could possibly exist. An unfathomably large number, but finite nonetheless.

That’s the basic idea behind artist Jeffrey Thompson‘s Every Possible Photograph project. Thompson has created an installation that, given enough time, will generate every possible photograph by stepping through every possible combination of pixels.
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How to Photograph Yourself With a Loved One if You’re Forever Alone

If you’re forever alone and want to photograph yourself locked in a warm embrace in a doorway, check out this article by Japanese website Daily Portal — one of the strangest photography tutorials we’ve ever seen.
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Are the Mirrors Inside DSLR Cameras Ever-So-Slightly Green?

You know the infinitely long tunnel that appears when you look into two mirrors that are pointed at one another? Have you ever noticed that the tunnel becomes more and more green, the deeper you go?

YouTube personality Vsauce has a fascinating new video titled “What Color Is A Mirror?”. In it, Mr. Sauce explains that this is due to the fact that there is no such thing as a perfect mirror (i.e. a mirror that perfectly reflects 100% of light). The fact is, a typical mirror best reflects light in the 510nm range, which we perceive as green light.
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Kodak Used a Calendar That Had 13 Months

Here’s a random but interesting piece of photo-related trivia: did you know that Kodak used a calendar that had 13 months? It was called the “International Fixed Calendar“, and was proposed by a guy named Moses B. Cotsworth in 1902. The system divided each year into 13 months of 28 days each, with one or two days each year not belonging to any month. The extra month was named “Sol”, and appeared between June and July. Although it was never officially adopted by any country, Kodak founder George Eastman became a huge supporter of the new calendar, and instituted it as the official calendar of Kodak in 1928. It would remain the company’s calendar of choice until 1989. Because of this, an alternate name for the calendar is “the Eastman plan”.


Image credit: Calendar Advice by brandoncripps