Posts Tagged ‘rain’

A Creative Light Painting Photograph That Makes Sparks Look Like Rain

After seeing an online tutorial on steel wool light painting, photographer Simon Berger found a friend to model for him and went out to try his hand at the technique. After some initial success, he started brainstorming creative ideas that he hadn’t seen before. The result of the brainstorming was this stunning shot that makes the sparks from a burning piece of steel wool look like rain falling on an umbrella.
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Make a DIY Rain Cover for Your DSLR Using a Ziploc Bag

If you need to do a quick shoot in the rain but don’t have a proper rain cover handy, you can quickly put together a makeshift one using a large Ziploc freezer bag. Photographer Kariann Goodkey over at Purple Summit Photography has a step-by-step tutorial on the conversion, which basically involves cutting out a whole and using gaffer tape to secure your lens hood to the “cover”. Goodkey writes,

If you are going to be out in the rain a long time you might want to get a proper cover to protect your investment though! That said I used this in over 6 hours of continuous rain sitting in the bush photographing a horse ride and my camera kept dry. After about three hours with this set up I did start to get condensation on the inside of the bag. This limited my view quite a bit through the viewfinder but I could still photograph and my camera was fine. For a quick shoot in the rain though this will work great.

DIY Camera rain cover [Purple Summit Photography]

Use Your Coffee Cup to Predict Whether Rain Will Ruin Your Outdoor Shoot

Did you know that your morning cup of coffee can help you predict rain? It’s a trick used by backpackers that can come in handy you’re shooting outdoors without Internet: pour a cup of coffee and carefully watch the bubbles. Backpacker Magazine writes,

If the bubbles amass in the center, you’re in a high-pressure system, which is making the coffee’s surface convex (higher in the middle). Since bubbles are mostly air, they migrate to the highest point. It’s going to be a beautiful day. If the bubbles form a ring around the sides of the mug, you’re in a low-pressure system, making the surface concave. Rain is likely. Note: It has to be strong, brewed coffee to have enough oil to work, and the mug must have straight sides.

To make new bubbles, simply give your coffee a good stir.

(via Backpacker Magazine via Instructables via Lifehacker)


Image credit: drip by subsetsum

Use Fake Rain for Intense Action Shots

This behind-the-scenes video shows how fake rain inside a studio was used to shoot a series of action shots for Men’s Health magazine.

(via ISO 1200)

How to Make a DIY Rain Machine

Here’s a nifty behind-the-scenes video tutorial by photographer Jay P. Morgan that shows how to make a cheap DIY rain machine for adding rain to your photographs.

(via f stoppers)

Olympus Looking into Making Lens Shake a Useful Feature

Olympus recently filed a patent in Japan for a novel lens feature that shakes the front element in order to remove droplets of water.

Filters would obviously render the shaking feature useless on a DSLR system, but for a smaller compact camera designed to be waterproof and rugged, this feature would probably come in handy.

The patent also seems to indicate that the shaking would occur during autofocusing, so the lens would be cleared of water immediately before the camera exposes a shot.

What are your thoughts on this potential future feature?

(via Photo Rumors)

Rain Photographs by Navid Baraty

New York-based photographer Navid Baraty has a series of incredibly beautiful rain photographs made in San Francisco and Japan. We first came across the photograph above, titled “Rain Dance”, in Pictory’s “San Francisco” showcase. It was taken in San Francisco’s Union Square with a Nikon D700. There’s just something about the composition and lighting that blew us away.
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Humorously Impractical SLR Rain Cover

Most camera rain covers can be a bit cumbersome, but this Japanese rain cover concept might take the hassle to a whole new level. In fact, a freezer bag seems more practical.

While the cover is designed to be wallet-friendly, it’s probably much less kind to the user. It may be remarkably typhoon-proof, but forget long lenses, manual focus, zoom, and image sharpness, to name a few essential DSLR features lost to design flaws.

However, hailing from Japan, it’s possible that this accessory is simply a “chindogu” invention.

(via Gizmodo)