Posts Tagged ‘quality’

Back to Basics: 5 Reasons Why Beginners Should Invest in a Prime Lens

If you have a friend who just got into photography and they ask you to recommend a first lens to buy in addition to the standard kit lens, chances are very good you’re going to tell them to go prime. Of course, their next question will inevitably be ‘why?’

When that question comes, just point them to this great short video by photographer Toby Gelston. In it, Gelson outlines five reasons why a prime lens should be taking up space in their new gear bag. From value to that bokehliciousness, Gelson covers all of the basics so that you don’t have to.

(via PictureCorrect)

Compressor.io Lets You Shrink Your Image File Size Up to 90% Without Losing Quality

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If you’ve been following PetaPixel for a little while, then you know that the idea of a web app that shrinks down the file size of your images without “noticeable” loss in quality is nothing new. JPEGmini has been doing it for years. So what is it that makes the new Compressor.io web app stand out? Read more…

Humorous Samsung Video Takes on the Perception that Bigger Cameras are Better

When it comes to cameras, is bigger always better? Samsung didn’t try to answer that question, but the company did shoot a funny video that shows pretty clearly that the general public seems to think the answer is “yes,” even if there’s no difference at all. Read more…

The Print Quality Across Various Editions of “American Photographs”

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Walker Evans’ famous photo book “American Photographs” was first published in 1938. Since then, the book has been released in new editions every 25 years or so. Although the photos contained within its covers have remained the same, the processes and technologies used to print the photos have evolved over time, causing each edition to be every so slightly different from the others.
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Cameras in Phones Are Now Better Than Compact Cameras from 5 Years Ago

A few weeks ago, we casually remarked that the best cameraphones today can probably snap better photos than top-of-the-line compact cameras from over a decade ago. Turns out that it’s true.
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Check Out These Full-Res Sample Photos Shot Using the New iPhone 5

Earlier today, Apple announced its new iPhone 5, which features a camera that’s nearly identical to the one found in the 4S. Soon after the announcement, Apple put up the official product page for the phone, which includes a gallery of sample photographs shot using the iPhone 5. Unfortunately, none of the shots show low-light environments, which would have allowed us to gawk at the power of the camera’s new and improved noise-killing processor. For now, we’ll just have to settle for these generic shots showing what the 3264×2448 images look like when they pop out of the camera.
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Leaked Sample Shots Show the High ISO Performance of the Sony A99

A user over on the Chinese forum Xitek has leaked the first sample photographs captured using the Sony A99, the company’s upcoming flagship SLT (i.e. pellicle mirror) camera. The images are 100% crops of straight-out-of-camera JPEGs, with noise reduction completely turned off.
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40MP Shootout: Nokia 808 PureView vs Pentax 645D

Nokia’s 808 PureView phone packs a hefty 41-megapixel sensor, but how do its megapixels compare to a “real” 40+ megapixel camera photo? Spanish website Quesabesde decided to find out by putting the phone head-to-head with the 40MP Pentax 645D medium format DSLR. They shot the same scenes with both cameras, and blew them up to examine the quality. The article is in Spanish, but a little Google Translate magic does the trick.

Nokia 808 and Pentax 645D PureView: 40 megapixel face to face (via TOP)

This Is Why You Shouldn’t Buy a Cheap UV Filter for Your Lens

UV lens filters are a popular way to protect the front element of lenses from damage, but you should make sure you invest in a high-quality one unless you want to make a huge sacrifice in image quality. Reddit user EvilDoesIt shot the photos above comparing a cheap filter with a pricier one:

The top one is a $20 Quantaray UV filter. Bottom is a ~$70 B+W MRC UV filter. This is a more extreme example, but it shows the difference between a nice filter and a crappy cheap one. Both these shots are unedited JPEGs from my Nikon D7k with a Nikkor 17-55 ƒ/2.8 @ 1.3s ISO100.

I do realize that the top pic can be easily fixed by adjusting levels, but in my opinion, it’s always better to get the best picture you can get out of your camera before editing. [#]

His last sentence is a gem: to achieve the best images, you want to make sure you’re squeezing out the best image quality you can from each step along the way.


Image credit: Photographs by EvilDoesIt and used with permission

DxOMark: Canon 5D Mark III Sensor Best Among Canons, Falls Short of Nikon

Camera rating business DxOMark has published its in-depth sensor review for the Canon 5D Mark III. For Canon fans, there’s both good and bad news: while the camera boasts the best sensor seen in a Canon DSLR so far — besting the sensor found in the 1Ds Mark III — its score of 81 is far below the Nikon D800′s 95. DxOMark does, however, point out that the two cameras focus on different strengths:

The duel between the Nikon D800 and the EOS 5D Mark III would most certainly take place except that the different sensors each one has adopted makes it difficult to do a head-to-head comparison. Both sensors offer different advantages —in principle, sensitivity for the Canon and definition for the Nikon. With its 36 megapixels, the Nikon D800 clearly has concentrated its efforts on fine detail reproduction.

For its part, the Canon EOS 5D Mark III chose to make a grand compromise: with its 22 megapixels, it offers both higher definition and in theory, higher sensitivity.

Canon 5D Mark III Review [DxOMark]