Posts Tagged ‘psychology’

The Image, Deconstructed: Offering Insight Into Quality Photojournalism

The Image Deconstructed

We love seeing and hearing about the process of creating an image. The motivation behind a photo combined with a glimpse at how it was shot can be both inspirational and educational, which is a powerful combo.

But while there are plenty of behind the scenes videos and articles dedicated to studio photography, one of the genres you don’t get to hear as much about is photojournalism. That’s where The Image, Deconstructed website comes in. Read more…

Incredible Steel Wool Light Paintings Done to Look Like Rorschach Ink Blots

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Light-painting, like time-lapse, is a genre of photography that is packed full of talent, making it really hard to pick quality work to feature (if you haven’t already, check out this list of 10 amazing light-painting photogs you should follow right away).

We were thrilled, therefore, when we stumbled across Nicolas Rivals‘ series of steel wool light painting Rorschach tests dubbed, simply enough, Light Rorchach. Read more…

Taking Photographs Weakens Memories, Psychological Study Finds

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Here’s something that both photographers and the typical millennial have to look forward to in old age: Your memory is going to suck because of all the photos you took when you should have been paying attention to what was happening around you.

That’s the upshot of a new psychological study that finds you can have a good photographic record of an event or a good memory, but not both. Read more…

The Instagram Diet: Looking at Pictures of Food Curbs Appetite, Study Finds

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Believing the world cares what you had for lunch may still be a symptom of narcissism, but a recent study seems to indicate that it could at least be a useful form of narcissism.

The study, which was conducted by marketing researchers at Brigham Young University, found that the more time people spend looking at pictures of food, the less interested they become in actually eating that same foods. Results were published recently in the Journal of Consumer Psychology. Read more…

Your Style, Your Personality

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In all art forms; music, writing, architecture, photography, whatever; originality and innovation are the things that produce the best works from the best artists. A lot of advice on how to improve your art focusses on technical and technological aspects; often with a cursory “develop your own style” thrown in somewhere. It’s a difficult thing to explain or teach: how do you develop your vision or style? And how do you know if you’ve found it?
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The Science of G.A.S.

A look at the reasons behind Gear Acquisition Syndrome (G.A.S.), when people get hooked on buying camera equipment they don't need

Aug 03, 2013 · Joshua Sarinana

Snapping Instagram Photos of Food May Actually Help Things Taste Better

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Annoyed at people who have a habit of snapping a quick food photo before every meal? There might be a scientific explanation for why some of them do so: scientists have found that that rituals such as snapping a quick food pic may actually help make eating more pleasurable for the eater.
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Memories, Photographs, and the Human Brain

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There has been a good deal written about the similarities of the camera to the eye as well as the computer to human memory. What I would like to do is clarify the uniqueness of the human brain from camera technology and at the same time show the similarities between brain function, photography and cognition.
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Research Shows that Online Camera Gear Reviews May Be Distorted by Fanboys

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Can you trust camera reviews submitted by customers of online retailers? Not entirely, suggests a new academic study, and not for the reasons you might think.
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Pictures Over Experience?

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We recently published an article about She & Him enacting an anti-photo policy at a gig. Signs were posted saying “At the request of Matt [Ward] and Zooey [Deschanel], we ask that people not use their cell phones to take pictures and video, but instead enjoy the show they have put together in 3D”.

It reminded me of a story my Father told me about a Frank Zappa concert. Apparently, people were given opaque-lens glasses at the request of Zappa and the band so that, audience-members could more fully experience the music without any visual distractions.
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