Posts Tagged ‘projects’

How to Make a DIY DSLR Viewfinder

Want a DSLR viewfinder but don’t want to pay big bucks for a professional one? Photojojo has a tutorial on how you can build your own DIY version using a lens from a pair of magnifying reading glasses and some plastic/foam board. It’ll definitely draw some weird looks but hey, it works!

How to Make Your Own DSLR Viewfinder [Photojojo]

DIY Leica Rangefinder Camera Bag

Cut Out + Keep member Myam made this awesome Leica-style messenger bag for a photography-lovin’ friend. Sadly there’s no tutorial for this bag, but she says that the process is identical to what’s seen in this guitar bag tutorial she wrote. A padded insert can also be added to make the bag more suitable for holding cameras. This bag could definitely make for a fun weekend project and photography gift.

Also, be sure to check out this Diana+ bag she made, and this Leica bag that was inspired by Myam’s bag.

More People Have Walked on the Moon Than Have Captured the Analemma

Want a challenging photography project? Try capturing an analemma in a single shot. “Analemma” is the name given to the figure-eight shape traced by the sun if photographed at the same time of day over the course of a year. To capture it, you’ll need to leave your camera in a fixed position and shoot photos at exactly the same time of day for all of the shots.
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Real Tilt-Shift with a Canon 5D Using a 62-Year-Old Lens and Bellows

Flickr user Alex12Ga turned his Canon 5D Mark II into a DIY digital view camera by mounting a Novar-Anastigmat 75mm f/3.5 lens from 1949 with its original bellows. He mounted the bellows to his camera using an aluminum plate and an EOS mount ring that he salvaged from a broken Sigma lens.
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Matrix-style Bullet Time Photos Using 20 Polaroid Cameras

Line up an array of digital cameras and you’ll have yourself a setup that can take Matrix-style bullet-time shots. Artist Sam Blanchard created a similar rig, but went with Polaroid cameras instead of digital ones. The project, titled Polaroid Matrix, consists of 20 Polaroid cameras arranged in a circle and modified to be triggered remotely. After the cameras are triggered to simultaneously capture photos of the subject in the center, the Polaroid pictures are arranged and turned into a Flipbook.
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Photographer Richard Misrach and His Hurricane Katrina Graffiti Photos

After Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, photographer Richard Misrach visited the empty city and documented the destruction. Although he shot roughly 1,000 photos using an 8×10 large format camera, he noticed that many of the snapshots he captured using a point-and-shoot camera told an interesting story of what had occurred. These photos, which showed the graffiti messages left by residents fleeing their homes, were subsequently published in a book titled “Destroy this Memory“. In the video above, Misrach tells the story of how the project came to be.

Destroy This Memory (via dvafoto)

Photographer Captures Reactions to His “I’m Going to be a Dad” News

After finding out that he was going to become a father, photographer Tom Robinson decided to make a creative photo project out of the task of telling his family and friends by capturing their expressions at the moment of hearing the news.
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Give Your Room a Beautiful Skyline View Using an Ordinary Printer

After moving into their new dorm room, Caleb Ungewitter and his roommate Kyle decided that their walls looked too empty, so they decided to decorate it with a photo. Not just any photo, mind you, but a gigantic do-it-yourself print of a beautiful city skyline. Using a free program called The Rasterbator, they converted the photograph into 152 separate frames, which they printed out themselves and attached to the wall in a grid.
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People in Fake Squares Photographed from Fake Heights

The photographs in Adam Magyar‘s Square series appear to show crowds of people bustling about in open town squares, seen from a height that makes them look almost like ants. In reality, each photograph is actually a composite of hundreds of individual photos, and none of the squares actually exist. Magyar photographed strangers walking on sidewalks from only 3-4 meters off the ground, and then blended the photographs together to make them seem like they were captured from a fake height!
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Clever Wedding Photo Booth Made Using a Canon T3i

We’ve seen DSLR photo booth projects before, but usually they’re just simple ways for guests at an event to take self-portraits of themselves. Kevin over at I Dream In Code actually made a fancy photo booth for his brother’s wedding that prints out a nice keepsake for guests:

It is an Arduino connected to a Staples easy button. When pressed, it starts the sequence of taking 4 pictures on the Canon T3i, triggered through the 2.5mm earphone jack.

The pictures are wirelessly transferred over an adhoc network using an EyeFi Pro SD card. On the laptop, it is looking in a directory for 4 pictures, takes the 4 of them, combines them into one photo along with a picture of Andrew and Jenn, and prints it out.

The entire process from pressing the Easy Button to having the photo pop out takes about 1 minute and 30 seconds. Check out his blog post for more of the technical details.

Automated Photobooth (via Reddit)