Posts Tagged ‘project365’

Dad Captures One Second Per Day of His Son’s First Year of Life

On July 9th, 2012, photographer Sam Cornwell of Hayling Island, England welcomed his son Indigo into the world and became a father for the first time. Starting on that life-changing day, Cornwell and his wife Beverley have been documenting the growth of their boy by capturing at least one second of video every single day.

Yesterday, one year and thousands of videos after the project began, the photographer took the clips and combined them into the beautiful “moving time-lapse” seen above.
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Cesar Kuriyama on Documenting His Life with One Second of Video Each Day

Director Cesar Kuriyama received a good bit of attention on the Internet last year for capturing 1 second of video on each day of his 30th year of life, and then turning the snippets into a beautiful recap of his year. The video premiered during a TED talk Kuriyama gave in March. That talk has just been published by TED, and can be seen above.
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One Second of Video Every Day in 2012

We’ve been seeing more and more of this concept lately, but this one is still nicely done: Springfield, Missouri-based photographer Kent Frost created this 6.5-minute recap of his life in 2012 using one second of footage recorded each day. It’s titled, “Just a Second.”
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One Year’s Worth of Breakfasts Captured in a Single Photo Collage

breakfasts

If you ever have enough patience and dedication to capture one photograph of something each day for an entire year, you should think about creating a collage with the photos once the project is completed. Tiffany Yung snapped photos of breakfasts she ate during 2012 and then created this photo collage once the year was over. She writes,

This is the culmination of my year-long “project.” This is everything I ate for breakfast in 2012 (350 days of breakfast…the 6 days missing are the days I either didn’t get to eat breakfast, or forgot to take a picture). I ate a lot of oatmeal and cereal and bananas and bagels and “jook” (congee) this year. Some mornings, breakfast was “lavish,” while other mornings were smaller and plainer because I had to rush out the door. I love breakfast and I try to never miss it. It can really make or break my day.

You can find a high-resolution version of the collage here. This could make for a neat poster for most subjects — especially the growth of a newborn baby!

Breakfast [Up and Up via Doobybrain]

Fujifilm Baby Box: Capture the First 365 Days of a Baby’s Life with Instant Photos

Fujifilm is selling a cool Instax Mini instant camera kit over in Japan that makes it easy for new parents to do a 365-day photo project documenting the first year of their child’s life. Called the Fujifilm Baby Box, the package includes an Instax Mini 25 camera (in either pink or blue), a photo album for holding the prints, a 5-pack of Instax film containing 50 shots, and a sheet containing 365 round stickers with hearts containing the numbers 1 through 365.

Over the course of a year (and a little over 6 additional packs of film), parents can snap daily pictures and label the instant prints with the day it was taken on by sticking a heart to it.
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365 Day Photo Project with Whiteboard Results in Creative Stop Motion Video

This creative stop-motion video was created over the course of one year by a boy named Kristen (unbeatableme on YouTube). He took at least one photograph every day for 365 days showing himself standing in front of a whiteboard. By changing elements inside the shot (e.g. his clothing, the art on the whiteboard, his hair), Kristen made one of the most “time-consuming” animation projects we’ve seen.
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Newspaper Photographer Snapping One Portrait Every Day In His City

Everyday People is a photo project for Oklahoma newspaper Tulsa World by photographer John Clanton. The goal is to meet one new person in the community every day of the year, create a portrait of them, and display the image along with a short blurb about who they are. Clanton writes,

Looking at the 2012 calendar and trying to imagine getting a portrait every single day seemed daunting before I started. Photo Editor Christopher Smith and I refined the idea through several conversations at the end of last year. We picked a consistent, vertical composition, always using a 50mm lens and decided that the discipline of looking for a picture every single day was of utmost importance. I’m not allowed to stockpile pictures and then release them on a different day.

I’m not looking for people who stand out in a crowd. The majority aren’t famous or in positions of power. They’re just Everyday People, like me. They are your neighbors, your co-workers, your kids’ teachers, the guy who prepared your food or the people you drove past on your way to work. They are people who love their work or live for their past-times. They are people with plenty to say or just enough time for a picture. Through these portraits I’m getting to know the city.

Everyday People [Tulsa World]


Thanks for sending in the tip, Mark!

Creative 365-Day Self-Portrait Project by a 17-Year-Old Photographer

Last October, Portland-based 17-year-old photographer Brendon Burton began an ambitious project in which he committed to creating one self-portrait every day for a year. Now, half a year later, Burton is still going strong and his Flickr photostream is full of beautiful and creative images that document his development as a photographer.
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Photographer Shoots One Image or Video of Clouds Every Day

Back on July 1, 2009, artist Kelly DeLay began a personal project titled “Clouds 365″ with the goal of shooting a photo or video or clouds every single day for a year. After completing his goal 365 days later, he decided to keep going. He has now amassed over 1000 days of documenting clouds, and his popular website (which receives millions of visitors each year) was recently nominated for a Webby Award. In case you’re wondering what DeLay does on cloudless days: not all the photos show actual clouds.

Clouds 365 (via MetaFilter)

Man Records 1 Second of Footage from Each Day at Age 30

Cesar Kuriyama spent a couple years saving enough money to take an entire year off from work — his 30th year of life. He spent that year living frugally, doing all the things he never had enough time to do: travelling, personal creative projects, and spending time with family. He decided to document that special year by capturing 1 second of footage every single day and creating a short compilation video at the end, similar to Madeline’s video that we shared back in January. After completing the year, Kuriyama now is planning to capture 1 second from each day for the rest of his life. This means he’ll have a 5-hour video summarizing 50 years of life if he lives to be 80, since every decade creates roughly one hour of video.

(via Coudal)