Posts Tagged ‘project’

The Largest Photography Project Ever Sponsored by the United States

You probably know of the iconic photograph titled Migrant Mother, but do you know the government photo project that led to its creation? Between 1935 and 1943, the US Government launched the largest photo project in the history of the country through its Resettlement Administration (RA) — later called the Farm Security Administration (FSA). The project enlisted the likes of Walker Evans and Dorothea Lange to help educate citizens in the East about what was going on in the West, and the giant PR campaign ended up producing over 170,000 photos and one of the most important photo collections in the US. The lecture above by Yale student Lauren Tilton offers a brief history lesson on this project.

(via PhotoTuts+)

Dancing Around the World with a Camera in Hand

Seattle-based techie Matt Harding became an Internet celebrity back in 2005 after a video of him dancing in various locations around the world went viral online. Now he’s back again with a new 2012 edition that’s sure to go just as viral. Harding spent months traveling to tens of countries around the world, capturing short clips of himself dancing with thousands of people. The project is titled, “Where the Hell is Matt?“.
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200 Yards: A Photo Project Documenting SF Through a Hyperlocal Lens

200 Yards is a neat photo project based in San Francisco that centers around the idea of having photographers point cameras at a small section of a particular city. For each cycle, organizers pick a particular “alternative gallery space” and invite photographers to create photographs within a 200-yard radius of that location (this translates to roughly one block in each direction). Submissions are then whittled down until 12 photographers remain, and these artists are invited to the resulting exhibition at the gallery space.

200 Yards (via Photojojo)

DIY Lamp Made Using Vintage Cameras and Slide Film

Camera hoarder Stacie Grissom of Stars for Streetlights received a massive collection of old cameras from her uncle a couple years ago. She soon discovered that she wouldn’t possibly have time to use all of them, so she took a few of the neglected and worn down ones and made a one-of-a-kind lamp for her home. The cameras were turned into the lamp base using a pipe and some cold weld, and the lamp shade was made using color slide film. If you have some broken cameras lying around and want to make your own, Grissom has detailed her entire process over on her blog.

How to Make a Lamp from Vintage Cameras (via Make)


Image credit: Photograph by Stacie Grissom/Stars for Streetlights

Humans of New York: A Photographic Census of New York City

The United States is a diverse country, but there are few places in the US as diverse as New York City: “the greatest city on earth.” In many ways The City’s diversity makes it a street photographer’s gold-mine, and it’s this mine that photographer Brandon┬áStanton┬áhas been meticulously digging through over the last couple of years. Read more…

Rotobooth is a Photo Booth Powered by a Rotary Phone

Created by Chris Bell, Liangjie Xia, and Mike Kelberman, Rotobooth is a novel new photo booth with a twist — literally. It’s powered by a hacked rotary phone and shoots a photo after the user dials their cell phone number. The image is then automatically uploaded to Flickr and a link to the photo is sent as a text message to the phone number provided. Check out this interview with Kelberman to learn more about the project and this Flickr set to see some behind-the-scenes photos.

Rotobooth (via Make via Laughing Squid)


Image credit: Photograph by Mike Kelberman

Woman Aims to Meet and Photograph Her 626 Facebook Friends in Real Life

After amassing 626 friends on Facebook two years ago, Tanja Hollander began to wonder how many of them were actually friends in the conventional sense. She then set out to answer the question by meeting each one of them and photographing them in their homes. The portraits are published on a website set up for the project, titled The Facebook Portrait Project, and each photo includes some information about the subject and their relationship to Hollander.
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Ten Magnum Photographers Working on Portrait of Rochester

Some might say that the city of Rochester, New York is struggling; others might say that it’s evolving. One thing’s for sure though: Rochester — nicknamed The World’s Image Centre — is changing. Because of this, and because of the city’s rich photographical history (think Kodak), ten of Magnum Photos’ photographers have chosen Rochester as one of three locations currently being documented across the United States.
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Photographer Shoots One Image or Video of Clouds Every Day

Back on July 1, 2009, artist Kelly DeLay began a personal project titled “Clouds 365″ with the goal of shooting a photo or video or clouds every single day for a year. After completing his goal 365 days later, he decided to keep going. He has now amassed over 1000 days of documenting clouds, and his popular website (which receives millions of visitors each year) was recently nominated for a Webby Award. In case you’re wondering what DeLay does on cloudless days: not all the photos show actual clouds.

Clouds 365 (via MetaFilter)

Create Anthotype Photos Using the Photosensitive Juices of Plants

Looking for a weekend project? Try you hand at creating an anthotype, or an image created using photosensitive material from plants. Grind up some plant matter to harvest the juices, paint the juices onto some paper, place a negative over the paper, and then leave the image out under the sun. When it’s done exposing, scan the image to preserve it and place the print in a dark place, since light will slowly cause the image to disappear. Photojojo has a step-by-step tutorial on the process here.

DIY: Create Photographs Using Plant Matter! [Photojojo]