Posts Tagged ‘project’

A Day in the Life of a College Through Ten Disposable Cameras Left Around Campus

Ithaca College, a small private school in New York, recently conducted a fun photo experiment to capture a day in the life of the students on campus. Instead of sending a photographer around to various student hotspots, the student social media team left ten disposal cameras in five locations around campus with a note that read:

Hey, I just left this camera here for the day. Take some fun pictures with you and your friends! I’ll be back later to pick it up

At the end of the day, all the cameras were collected, all the film was developed, revealing an “authentic view of a day at Ithaca College.”
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Bob Carey on Using Tutu Self-Portraits to Support Women with Cancer

Back in March, we wrote about photographer Bob Carey‘s Tutu Project, which consists of self-portraits Carey created while wearing only a pink tutu. The project started out as a fun image made for a non-profit ballet organization, but soon transformed into something much more after Carey’s wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. The folks over at PocketWizard recently interviewed Carey, creating the touching short film above that offers a behind-the-scenes look at how the project came about (warning: you might want to have some Kleenex nearby).
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Jump Man: An Amazing Self-Portrait-A-Day Video Five Years in the Making

After the viral success of Noah Kalina’s self-portrait-a-day video everyday, there has been no shortage of people copying the idea and creating their own versions of the project. However, not many come close to the awesomeness and creativity of the video above, created by a guy named Mike (Thisnomyp on YouTube).

Almost exactly one year after Kalina’s video hit the web, Mike began taking one self-portrait each day, starting on August 25, 2007. Five years later, this past weekend, Mike was able to compile all the photos into the video seen above, titled “Jump Man.”
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I Am CC Allows Instagram Users to Share Under a Creative Commons License

Flickr’s Creative Commons licensing options allows its users to grant licenses that allow creators to make use of the photographs under a set of terms (e.g. attribution, non-commercial). Most photo sharing services have yet to bake Creative Commons licenses into their websites, but starting today, Instagram users can now release their photos under CC — albeit through a third-party solution.

It’s called I Am CC, and is a project started by LocalWiki founder Philip Neustrom that aims to “make the world a better, more creative place.”
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The Pixel Trade: Man Traveling the World with Photos Rather than Money

Everyone knows that traveling is expensive. Some people say that photography is expensive as well (both creating and buying it). The two things should therefore be a natural fit, right?

Australian photographer Shantanu Starick thinks so. He’s currently undertaking one of the most ambitious photo projects we’ve heard of: traveling the world with photos rather than money. His website, The Pixel Trade, tells the visual tale of his incredible journey.
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A Picture of a Picture of a Picture of a Picture of a Picture of a Picture…

The video above is one of the trippiest things you’ll see today. It’s a video showing a seemingly endless transition from a picture of a picture, to a picture of that picture of a picture, and so on. Want to know how it was made?
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(Re)touching Lives Through Photos and Using Photoshop for Good

Photoshopping gets a lot of bad press due to the fact that it’s often used to “make skinny models skinner and perfect skin more perfect”, but there are also people out there using it for good. The video above is a recent TED talk given by retoucher Becci Mason on how Photoshopping was used to bring joy and memories back to those affected by the devastating 2011 tsunami in Japan.
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12 Years of Self-Portraits in 1 Image

In 2000, photographer Noah Kalina started his everyday self-portrait project that spawned a viral video (and countless copycats) six years later. He’s now twelve and a half years into the project now, and shows no signs of slowing down. The image above shows the 4,514 pictures he snapped of himself between January 11, 2000 and June 30, 2012. Kalina is also planning to release an updated version of the video that runs 7:41 min — 10 frames per second and 1 month every 3 seconds.

(via Noah Kalina via Laughing Squid)

Portraits with Witty Hand-Painted Signs

Artists Anna Gray and Ryan Wilson Paulsen have a two-year-long project titled 100 Posterworks that features B&W portraits in various locations, with standard compositions, featuring witty messages on hand-painted signs.

Through the posters we address philosophical questions, comment on political or artistic issues, quote, complain, poke fun and indirectly document our lives. They can be read as a kind of cumulative (and often contradictory) artist statement.

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Newspaper Photographer Snapping One Portrait Every Day In His City

Everyday People is a photo project for Oklahoma newspaper Tulsa World by photographer John Clanton. The goal is to meet one new person in the community every day of the year, create a portrait of them, and display the image along with a short blurb about who they are. Clanton writes,

Looking at the 2012 calendar and trying to imagine getting a portrait every single day seemed daunting before I started. Photo Editor Christopher Smith and I refined the idea through several conversations at the end of last year. We picked a consistent, vertical composition, always using a 50mm lens and decided that the discipline of looking for a picture every single day was of utmost importance. I’m not allowed to stockpile pictures and then release them on a different day.

I’m not looking for people who stand out in a crowd. The majority aren’t famous or in positions of power. They’re just Everyday People, like me. They are your neighbors, your co-workers, your kids’ teachers, the guy who prepared your food or the people you drove past on your way to work. They are people who love their work or live for their past-times. They are people with plenty to say or just enough time for a picture. Through these portraits I’m getting to know the city.

Everyday People [Tulsa World]


Thanks for sending in the tip, Mark!